Minneapolis Real Estate – Himspairport http://himspairport.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:43:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://himspairport.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Minneapolis Real Estate – Himspairport http://himspairport.com/ 32 32 Public hearing set for proposed UST stadiums at Highland Bridge https://himspairport.com/public-hearing-set-for-proposed-ust-stadiums-at-highland-bridge/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:43:47 +0000 https://himspairport.com/public-hearing-set-for-proposed-ust-stadiums-at-highland-bridge/ As the University of St. Thomas eye land in Highland Bridge for a series of new sports facilities, the St. Paul Planning Commission has scheduled a public hearing in early August for related changes to the old master plan for the Ford site and zoning code. Planner Mike Richardson presented preliminary details to the Planning […]]]>

As the University of St. Thomas eye land in Highland Bridge for a series of new sports facilities, the St. Paul Planning Commission has scheduled a public hearing in early August for related changes to the old master plan for the Ford site and zoning code.

Planner Mike Richardson presented preliminary details to the Planning Commission last week.

Ford Motor Co.’s sprawling Twin Cities Assembly Plant operated in Highland Park for about 85 years before closing in 2011. St. Paul City Council approved a master plan for the 135-acre cliffside parcel of the river in 2017, paving the way for some 3,800 proposed homes, among other real estate developments planned by Minneapolis-based Ryan Cos., the master developer.

In what some have described as a planning curve, St. Thomas recently proposed to build a sports complex on 23 acres of land in the southeast corner of the site west of Cleveland Avenue, part of which is still owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway.

The complex would cover 295,000 square feet of civic and institutional space, including a 4,000-4,500 seat hockey arena, a second ice rink for an indoor practice facility, a 1,000 seat outdoor softball field and a 1,500-seat outdoor baseball diamond. and a parking structure, additions that would require at least seven or eight masterplan changes, Richardson said.

“It took the city more than 10 years to decide what the master plan would be, and now it’s a huge change,” Planning Commission Chairman Luis Rangel Morales said Friday, noting that he had previously responded to public concerns about parking, affordable housing and environmental impacts.

“There are so many questions about it,” Rangel Morales said. “I know we are on a very difficult schedule. These questions should not be answered by (city) staff. The applicant should have to answer these questions.

CHANGES TO THE MASTER PLAN

Among the most radical changes, an already developed public park, Mica Park, should be moved. The 23-acre parcel of land, which includes a significant 15-25 foot grade change at its southern edges, sits just west of the Cleveland Avenue Bridge by minor wetlands. Additional parks are expected to be dedicated as Canadian Pacific Railway lands are added to the site.

The master plan does not specify exactly where the affordable housing will be located, but 110 proposed affordable housing units and additional office space established in a redevelopment plan would likely need to be reconsidered.

Planning Commission members noted on Friday that the master plan calls for 20% of all Highland Bridge housing to be affordable, so replacing planned affordable housing with sports facilities would not necessarily violate that vision if it were to be affordable. there was a commensurate decline in housing provided at market price.

Yet, with up to 763 affordable homes in various stages of planning, they expressed concern about losing any affordable homes.

Meanwhile, an ongoing study of the Blue Line/Riverview connection is examining how to connect Minneapolis‘ existing light rail to the future Riverview transit corridor on West Seventh Street, though whether the connection between the two would one day cross Highland. Bridge. If so, it could follow the Canadian Pacific Railway spur into the site at the southeast corner of the proposed sports campus.

PUBLIC AUDIENCE

The public hearing before the Planning Commission will be held at 8:30 a.m. on August 5, in Room 40 of St. Paul’s City Hall, 15 W. Kellogg Blvd.

The final decision to approve changes to the master plan would rest with St. Paul City Council, which would likely hear the proposal in September.

Comments may be submitted in writing to the St. Paul Planning Commission, c/o Mike Richardson, 1400 City Hall Annex, 25 W. Fourth St., St. Paul, MN 55102. The testimony must include your name and your address.

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Timothy K. ‘Tim’ Moore, Sr. Obituary https://himspairport.com/timothy-k-tim-moore-sr-obituary/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 19:13:02 +0000 https://himspairport.com/timothy-k-tim-moore-sr-obituary/ Moore Sr., Timothy K. Tim was born May 3, 1953 (a proud triple Taurus earth sign) in Minneapolis MN to Carroll J. and Gail V. (Hoyt) Moore, and sister Alice (15) and son brother Mike (10) (all of whom were waiting to welcome him home when he left this life on June 7, 2022.) His […]]]>

Moore Sr., Timothy K. Tim was born May 3, 1953 (a proud triple Taurus earth sign) in Minneapolis MN to Carroll J. and Gail V. (Hoyt) Moore, and sister Alice (15) and son brother Mike (10) (all of whom were waiting to welcome him home when he left this life on June 7, 2022.) His childhood stories of being the youngest in his NE Minneapolis family were idyllic, despite his asthma attacks. Gail died at age 48 of asthma shortly after Carroll, Gail and Tim moved to south Minneapolis, not far from her beloved Minnehaha Falls. The loss of his mother at the age of 11 darkens Tim’s life. Carroll remarried Connie Johnson and Tim had two sisters: Debra, 2 years older, and Laurie, 6 years younger. Tim made friends in his new community, well regarded at Nokomis Junior High and class leader at Roosevelt HS. He has been active in the local YMCA and served as Lieutenant Governor of the Youth in Government Program at the State Capitol. He enjoyed family time with his sisters and cousins ​​at the Rush Lake cabin, fishing, biking, baseball, and music (Beatles, Rolling Stones, and others far too many to mention. ) His one year at U of M left him with lifelong friends and interests. . Tim married Pamela Lee in 1978. After his daughter Sarah Jane was born in 1979, they moved with friends to the Brainerd Lakes area. Tim sold and taught real estate, and was elected Supervisor of Wabado Township, known for its land management workshops across the state. He began putting his much-admired “radio voice” to work on Brainerd’s WJJY-106. His son Timothy Kevin 2 arrived in 1983 and his daughter Alice Ann in 1986. He often said his biggest wish in life was “to be a dad”. After his divorce in 1989, he moved to the Twin Cities and began a series of customer service jobs, as well as other radio work on KLBB and several versions of “The Mighty 1280, WWTC”. While working part-time at Rivertown Trading/Public Radio Music Source, he met Erin Sim in 1995; they were life partners until his death. He actively attempted to preserve Coldwater Spring and precious oak trees, hosting a fundraising concert called “FOak Fest”. In the early 2000s, Tim suddenly lost 75% of his vision due to angle-closure glaucoma. He retired from the working world, but was still an avid gardener and “snow digger”, bird feeder, conversationalist with crows, cat hugger and creator of dozens of carefully curated playlists. selected from his extensive collection of musical genres, which he turned into gift CDs for friends and family. He was awarded 9th Ward Citizen of the Year in 2006 for coordinating a fundraiser for an injured neighbor. In 2009, he created a 10-minute documentary called “Heroes of 1968” for the MN Historical Society’s annual film competition that year, about meeting his greatest hero (after his father), Harmon Killebrew . The best part of the project, he said, was that Erin and her three children all helped him put it together. In 2010, Tim came up with the idea and wrote the script for a 5-minute film for the MELSA Short Film Competition promoting libraries, and again won “Best Screenplay” for “Out of the Park”, on Harmon Killebrew! Following in his father’s footsteps, he was a dedicated Master Mason (former former Master of a now closed lodge, and recent member of St. Paul Lodge #3, and for a time construction director of the historic Triune Temple.) Over the past few years, the late Swami Jaidev of the Institute of Himalayan Tradition nurtured Tim’s deep well of spirituality and curiosity. Tim listened to hours of audiobooks on a wide variety of topics and considered it “going back to college”. He was delighted with the arrival of grandchildren: Eamon, Kieran, Calvin, Phoebe and Isabelle, and always hoped to share with them his love of bears (teddy and wild varieties) and baseball. His failing eyesight, Covid-19 shutdown and a debilitating series of beatings smothered those goals. Following a collapse in his apartment in August 2021, he moved to Ebenezer Care Center, and brain damage from the strokes led to increasing dementia and poor anger control. Erin, Sarah, TK2 and Alice thank the friends who refused to give up their friendship when Tim’s injured brain tried to drive them away, as well as Nurse Betty, Nurse T, Chaplain Lee Daly and the many other Care Center staff who saw beyond the outbursts to a smart, funny man who just wanted company and deserved to be treated with friendliness and respect. The Hennepin County Hospice staff who have visited and cared for Tim regularly over the past two months have been invaluable to all of us; special thanks to the two Angies, Pam, Julia, Joan, Nick, Treska and the others. Gratitude to potter Denny Sponsler, TK2’s father-in-law, for creating a beautiful, meaningful urn. A private burial will take place later in July at Crystal Lake Cemetery near Gail and her parents. Tim will feel “at home” again. A celebration of Tim’s life will be held on Friday, July 8 from 1-4 p.m. (ceremony at 2 p.m.) at Picnic Shelter C in Wabun Park (closest to the Veterans Home and lock and dam). There will be music (of course), light refreshments and an opportunity to share your memories during the ceremony. Hawaiian shirts are welcome – Tim loved his! The family requests that all memorials be made to MN Pets, mnpets.com. Tim will be missed by his partner of 27 years, Erin Sim; his daughter Sarah Jane Park (Mark); sons Tim 2 (Emily) and grandchildren Eamon, Kieran and Phoebe; Alice Slaikeu (Andrew) and Calvin and Isabelle; sisters Debra Stalsitz (Lou) and Laurie Turner (John) and their families; brother Mike’s children, Tynan and Rebecca Moore, and widow Eleonor Kotkiewicz Moore; Sandy and Mike Alexander, Sister Alice’s “spare family”; and many other relatives and friends.

Posted on June 26, 2022

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Jack Hoeschler, St. Paul lawyer and civic advisor, dies at 80 – Twin Cities https://himspairport.com/jack-hoeschler-st-paul-lawyer-and-civic-advisor-dies-at-80-twin-cities/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 22:04:32 +0000 https://himspairport.com/jack-hoeschler-st-paul-lawyer-and-civic-advisor-dies-at-80-twin-cities/ At St. Paul’s City Hall, some saw John Gregory “Jack” Hoeschler as the proverbial legal foil – a relentless lawyer who returned to court, year after year, to pursue similar claims against the city on behalf of churches, non-profit organizations and homeowners concerned about their street ratings. Others saw him as an important civic voice […]]]>

At St. Paul’s City Hall, some saw John Gregory “Jack” Hoeschler as the proverbial legal foil – a relentless lawyer who returned to court, year after year, to pursue similar claims against the city on behalf of churches, non-profit organizations and homeowners concerned about their street ratings. Others saw him as an important civic voice and arts maven who brought crusading zeal rather than legal withdrawal to the many causes he fought for.

John “Jack” Hoeschler (Courtesy of Linda Hoeschler)

His 11-year legal odyssey against the city’s right-of-way charges will reach the Minnesota Supreme Court, which largely saw things its own way in 2016.

Over the past 13 months, Hoeschler has faced a much tougher challenge with advanced prostate cancer. He died Wednesday at his home in Saint-Paul, surrounded by his family. He was 80 years old.

He is survived by his wife, Linda Lovas Hoeschler, as well as a son, a daughter and two grandsons.

“Just a giant, such a giant in so many areas,” said St. Paul City Councilwoman Jane Prince, who called Hoeschler a friend and mentor. “He was the first president of the Commission riveraine Saint-Paul, where he worked hard to connect the city to the river. His contributions to the arts are legendary. He was such a principled fighter for the taxpayer and the general welfare of the city. I will miss him and keep him in my heart.

Hoeschler, who was born in La Crosse, Wisconsin, in February 1942, was a celebrity student and rower at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, where he was named a Robert Duffey-Scholar Athlete in 1964. He received a “full turn” Root-Tilden scholarship to attend New York University law school, then married a New Yorker who shared his appreciation for community and the arts.

In the mid-1960s, the two worked together as VISTA volunteers on Chicago’s South Side, where Hoeschler prosecuted predatory institutions on behalf of community advocates. He frequently appeared in areas with high gang activity to examine community concerns.

“I’ve never known anyone who needed less approval than Jack, or who tried to do the right thing without expecting direction or help, sometimes to their own detriment,” said his wife, in prepared remarks for her eulogy. “Often, Jack would go to a community meeting at a notorious project skyscraper, returning at midnight or after. I asked him if the locals thanked him for coming, for risking his life, as I saw. “Linda,” he said, as if it were obvious, “If you never expect to be thanked, you’ll never be disappointed.”

In 1968, the couple moved to St. Paul, where Hoeschler joined Minnesota’s oldest law firm, Doherty Rumble and Butler and quickly grew the firm’s real estate practice. He started his own practice in 1982, frequently counseling immigrants for free or at no cost.

As president of the St. Paul Riverfront Corporation, he worked to reorient the city toward the Mississippi River and coordinated legal and financial resources for the preservation of downtown Rice Park and its surrounding institutions. In 1978, some dubbed the new Science Museum of Minnesota “the house that Jack built”, and he also participated in the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and many other institutions artistic and cultural. .

Hoeschler and his wife formed a music commission club modeled after an investment club, inviting others to invest in their passion for new music. They also maintained an elaborate Japanese garden together surrounding their St. Paul home. In 1986 and 1987, they took their family around the world on a six-month traveling adventure.

A TOUGH GENTLEMAN LAWYER

In the late 1980s, Eric Nilsson found himself on the other side of the Hoeschler courtroom in a years-long legal battle over a failed downtown Union Depot business development.

“For the next few years, Jack and I fought every year,” Nilsson recalled Friday. “It turned out to be one of the most rewarding professional experiences I’ve ever had as a lawyer. I learned to appreciate Jack for his incredible intellectual courage and originality. He was a gentleman, and he had a wonderful sense of humor. We became good friends, and it proved to me that someone could be a zealous advocate for their client and still be civil and professional. And you don’t see that very often in the court process these days.

St. Paul real estate investor John Mannillo found himself on Hoeschler’s opposite side in 1981 when he sold the downtown Pioneer Building to First National Bank, which was then represented by Hoeschler.

“Even though he was on the other side of the issue, I respected him,” Mannillo said Friday. “He was a person of great integrity. He looked for the underdog on a number of things. And he was a fighter. He was tough. Usually you saw him standing up to the government – ​​the city — when he did not treat his constituents fairly.

A celebration of life is scheduled for August 22 at 10 a.m. at St. Olaf’s Church in Minneapolis, followed by a reception at the Minneapolis Club across the street.

Donations in his name will be accepted to the Regions Hospital Foundation Cancer Research Scholarship Fund, the Georgetown University team, the World Press Institute, local arts organizations “or any cause that “pays forward” to help others live better, more meaningful lives.

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MGEX will provide clearing as a service to Intelligent Medicine Exchange (IMX)™ https://himspairport.com/mgex-will-provide-clearing-as-a-service-to-intelligent-medicine-exchange-imx/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://himspairport.com/mgex-will-provide-clearing-as-a-service-to-intelligent-medicine-exchange-imx/ MINNEAPOLIS and CHICAGO, June 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Minneapolis Grain Exchange (MGEX™), a Designated Contract Market (DCM) and Derivatives Clearing Organization (DCO), and Intelligent Medicine Exchange (IMX)™, developer of the first dedicated futures market based on multiple aspects of the healthcare economy, today announced that it has entered into an agreement for MGEX to provide […]]]>

MINNEAPOLIS and CHICAGO, June 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Minneapolis Grain Exchange (MGEX™), a Designated Contract Market (DCM) and Derivatives Clearing Organization (DCO), and Intelligent Medicine Exchange (IMX)™, developer of the first dedicated futures market based on multiple aspects of the healthcare economy, today announced that it has entered into an agreement for MGEX to provide clearing services to IMX for certain cash-settled futures contracts and options. Services will include managing exhibitions, clearing trades, and collecting and maintaining performance bonds and security deposits for participants.

“We are pleased to provide clearing services to IMX as MGEX continues to execute its strategy of providing clearing solutions as a service in the futures markets,” said Mark G. Bagan, President and CEO of MGEX. “As a DCO with an unlimited license that allows us to offer a margin on cleared positions, we believe this agreement with IMX reinforces our strategy to provide innovative products and services to the futures industry.”

Earlier this month, IMX announced plans to launch the first financial exchange focused on the healthcare economy. The exchange has submitted an application to become a DCM with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and plans to list a number of contracts that will allow individual and institutional market participants to manage risk and invest in multiple components of the healthcare ecosystem. .

“MGEX provides essential clearing services as we grow our portfolio of innovative products that enable institutional and individual market participants – and those whose businesses depend on healthcare – to manage risk and invest in various aspects of healthcare ecosystem,” said Jacques Plante, CEO and co-founder of IMX. “Healthcare is the number one economic issue facing the nation, and we believe our next series of Healthcare Futures will provide participants with a powerful tool to more effectively manage risk and participate in this vital component of the economy.”

About MGEX

Minneapolis Grain Exchange (MGEX™) is a registered exchange with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and is a futures exchange registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). MGEX serves as the exclusive marketplace for a variety of products, including hard red spring wheat, SPIKES® futures, BRIXX™ commercial real estate futures and TAX futures. MGEX is a Designated Contracts Market (DCM) and Derivatives Clearing Organization (DCO) under the CFTC, providing DCM, DCO and spot market services across a range of asset classes. MGEX is a wholly owned subsidiary of Miami International Holdings, Inc. To learn more about MGEX, visit www.mgex.com.

About MIAX

MIAX’s parent company, Miami International Holdings, Inc., owns Miami International Securities Exchange, LLC (MIAX®), MIAX PEARL, LLC (MIAX Pearl®), MIAX Emerald, LLC (MIAX Emerald®), Minneapolis Grain Exchange, LLC (MGEX™) and Bermuda Stock Exchange (BSX™).

MIAX, MIAX Pearl, and MIAX Emerald are national SEC-registered securities exchanges that leverage MIAX’s state-of-the-art technology and infrastructure to provide their member firms with US-listed options trading. MIAX serves as the exclusive trading venue for cash-settled options on the SPIKES® Volatility Index (ticker: SPIKE), a measure of the expected 30-day volatility of the SPDR® S&P 500® ETF (SPY). In addition to options, MIAX Pearl makes it easy to trade stocks for cash through MIAX Pearl Equities™.

BSX is a fully electronic and vertically integrated international securities market regulated by the Bermuda Monetary Authority (BMA), specializing in the listing and trading of capital market instruments such as equities, debt issues, funds, hedge funds, derivative warrants and insurance-linked securities. A full member of the World Federation of Exchanges and an affiliate member of the International Organization of Securities Commissions, BSX is recognized globally, including by the SEC.

MIAX’s executive offices and national operations center are located in Princeton, New Jerseywith additional offices located in Miami, Florida, Minneapolis, Minnesotaand Hamilton, Bermuda.

To learn more about MIAX, visit www.MIAXOptions.com.

To learn more about BSX, visit www.bsx.com.

About IMX

IMX Health, LLC, also known as Intelligent Medicine Exchange (IMX), a subsidiary of holding company IMX, LLC, is developing the first dedicated futures market based on multiple aspects of health economics, which accounts for nearly 20% of US GDP. . The company, based in Chicago, has filed for regulatory approval with the United States Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) to become a Designated Contract Market (DCM). For more information, visit www.imxhealth.com.

Disclaimer and Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

The press release does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any securities of Miami International Holdings, Inc. (together with its subsidiaries, the Company) or IMX, LLC (together with its subsidiaries, IMX). , and does not constitute an offer, solicitation or sale in any state or jurisdiction in which such offer is made; the solicitation or sale would be unlawful. This press release may contain forward-looking statements, including forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements describe future expectations, plans, results or strategies and are generally preceded by words such as ” may”, “future”, “plan” or “expected”, “shall” or “should”, “expect”, “anticipate”, “draft”, “possibly” or “projected”. You are cautioned that such statements are subject to a multitude of risks and uncertainties that could cause future circumstances, events or results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, including the risks that actual results may differ. significantly from those projected. in forward-looking statements.

All third party marks (including logos and icons) referenced by the Company and IMX remain the property of their respective owners. Unless specifically identified as such, the Company’s and IMX’s use of third-party marks does not indicate any relationship, sponsorship, or endorsement between the owners of such marks and the Company or IMX. Any reference by the Company and IMX to third-party marks is intended to identify the corresponding third-party goods and/or services and shall be considered nominative fair use under trademark law.

Media contacts:
For MGEX:
Andy NyboSenior Vice President, Director of Communications
(609) 955-2091
[email protected]

For IMX:
Ellen G. ResnickCrystal clear communications
(773) 929-9292; (312) 399-9295 (mobile)
[email protected]

SOURCEMGEX

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Latest Minnesota news, sports, business and entertainment at 1:20 a.m. CDT | Minnesota News https://himspairport.com/latest-minnesota-news-sports-business-and-entertainment-at-120-a-m-cdt-minnesota-news/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 06:20:04 +0000 https://himspairport.com/latest-minnesota-news-sports-business-and-entertainment-at-120-a-m-cdt-minnesota-news/ FRATERNITY-HAZING Two former members of the Mizzou fraternity charged with hazing incident COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) – Two former members of a University of Missouri fraternity have been charged over a hazing incident that left another student blind and unable to walk or communicate after drinking a liter of vodka in October. The Columbia Missourian reports […]]]>

FRATERNITY-HAZING

Two former members of the Mizzou fraternity charged with hazing incident

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) – Two former members of a University of Missouri fraternity have been charged over a hazing incident that left another student blind and unable to walk or communicate after drinking a liter of vodka in October. The Columbia Missourian reports that a Boone County grand jury on Friday indicted former Phi Gamma Delta fraternity members Ryan Delanty and Thomas Shultz, both of St. Louis County, in the hazing of 19-year-old Daniel Santulli. of Eden Prairie, Minnesota. Both are charged with criminal hazing and misdemeanors of supplying alcohol to an underage or intoxicated person. Shultz also faces a felony for tampering with physical evidence as part of a felony prosecution.

ST. PAUL TRENCH COLLAPSE

Bodies of 2 workers recovered after trench collapse

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Authorities in St. Paul, Minn., confirmed that two construction workers died when a trench collapsed while they were working. The St. Paul Fire Department said on Twitter on Saturday that the bodies were found, a day after the collapse. The names of the victims have not been released. The crash happened around 2:45 p.m. Friday in the St. Paul’s Highland Park neighborhood. Deputy Fire Chief Roy Mokosso said another worker in the area called 911 and attempted a brief rescue, but authorities believe the workers died minutes after the collapse.

AP-US-ELECTION-2022-MINNESOTA-GOVERNOR

min. Republican threatens retaliation against medical board

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Jensen has threatened to retaliate against the Minnesota Board of Trustees that oversees doctors as it investigates him for the fifth time. Jensen calls the Minnesota Board of Medical Practice a “juggernaut” he will deal with if elected governor. Jensen, a Chaska family physician, is a COVID-19 vaccine skeptic who has promoted alternative treatments. He said in a video posted to Twitter on Thursday night that he shouldn’t have to practice medicine or run for governor with the cloud of a board inquiry hanging over him. The council consists of 16 people, all appointed by the governor.

TIR CLINIC-MINNESOTA

Judge: Attack that led to life imprisonment ‘simply unthinkable’

BUFFALO, Minn. (AP) — A judge has imposed a mandatory life sentence on a man who stormed a Minnesota medical clinic, shot and killed one person and injured four others, saying the act was unfathomable. Gregory Ulrich opened fire on February 9, 2021 at the Allina Crossroads Clinic in Buffalo, a city of about 16,400 people, 40 miles northwest of Minneapolis. He was sentenced on Friday. Earlier this month, a jury found Ulrich guilty of all 11 counts, including premeditated first-degree murder for killing Lindsay Overbay, a 37-year-old medical assistant. Four other clinic staff survived but were seriously injured. Wright County District Judge Catherine McPherson said at sentencing that the attack was “simply unthinkable”.

MINNESOTA LEGISLATURE

Unlikely Special Session on Minnesota’s Budget Surplus

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The odds seem dead for a special legislative session that could have brought billions of dollars in tax cuts and new spending to Minnesota. Democratic Gov. Tim Walz told reporters late Thursday that talks with Republican leaders were “at an impasse,” leaving about $7.2 billion of an initial $9.25 billion surplus unspent. About a week before the end of the regular session last month, Walz and key lawmakers announced a deal to use $4 billion to cut taxes, $4 billion to increase spending and save $4 billion. additional. Republican Senate Majority Leader Jeremy Miller blamed Democrats for the standoff, saying they wanted to spend too much.

DEAD CHIMPANZEE SANCTUARY

The group explodes Chimp Haven fights the dead; wild chimpanzees also kill

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — An animal rights group has filed a federal lawsuit against the National Chimpanzee Sanctuary once used for federal experiments. The group says the shrine’s care is poor. He cites a federal warning and Chimp Haven’s own reports of an escape and deaths caused by chimp fights. The northern Louisiana sanctuary said it acted immediately to change introduction procedures after a female died. It says it has treated more than 500 chimpanzees since it opened in 2005, and five deaths were due to assault. Experts say such deaths occur more frequently in the wild.

HOUSE FLIPPER-FRAUD

Minneapolis-area house pinball machine pleads guilty to fraud

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A woman who ran a Minneapolis-area house flipping business has pleaded guilty to defrauding real estate investors out of more than $3 million. Suzanne Griffiths is charged with one count of wire fraud and one count of money laundering. Authorities say she frequently made material misrepresentations about the status of real estate projects, failed to take promised steps, falsified documents and diverted investments for her own use. Griffiths, 46, is said to have recruited investors through seminars from a national real estate investment coaching program. Griffiths now resides in Arizona.

OIL FIELD STORAGE PROGRAM

Former Minnesota oil executive convicted of securities fraud

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A former Minnesota oil industry executive who co-founded a facility that loaded North Dakota crude onto railcars has been convicted of an inventory manipulation scheme. Earlier this week, a federal jury found Michael Reger guilty of securities fraud. The sentencing caps a lawsuit filed five years ago against Reger and fellow Wayzata-based Dakota Plains Holdings co-owner Ryan Gilbertson. The lawsuit alleges that Reger and Gilbertson intentionally manipulated the stock price during its first 20 days of trading. Gilbertson was convicted in 2018 and sentenced to 12 years in prison. Earlier this month, a federal judge gave preliminary approval to a $14 million settlement between shareholders and other directors and officers of the now-defunct company.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Readers Write: Mike Pence, Race Alliances, Indigenous School Rituals, United Nations https://himspairport.com/readers-write-mike-pence-race-alliances-indigenous-school-rituals-united-nations/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 22:46:11 +0000 https://himspairport.com/readers-write-mike-pence-race-alliances-indigenous-school-rituals-united-nations/ Review Editor’s Note: Star Tribune Opinion publishes letters readers online and in print every day. To contribute, click here. ••• Although I’m not a fan of his politics, former Vice President Mike Pence should be recognized as a great American hero (“Trump, Eastman knew the election ploy was wrong,” front page, June 17). I can’t […]]]>

Review Editor’s Note: Star Tribune Opinion publishes letters readers online and in print every day. To contribute, click here.

•••

Although I’m not a fan of his politics, former Vice President Mike Pence should be recognized as a great American hero (“Trump, Eastman knew the election ploy was wrong,” front page, June 17). I can’t imagine the courage it took for him to resist the pressure put on him.

Dennis J. Sutliff, Minneapolis

•••

According to Wikipedia, “The Presidential Medal of Freedom is an award given by the President of the United States to recognize individuals who have made “an especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States, to peace in the world, culture or other significant aspects. public or private enterprises.'”

After the committee hearing on Thursday, Jan. 6, President Joe Biden is expected to award Pence the Presidential Medal of Freedom. His rejection of former President Donald Trump’s efforts to stage his illegal coup plan clearly demonstrated his courage and loyalty to the Constitution.

Keith Bogut, Lake Elmo

RACIAL COMMITMENTS

Thanks to the Star Tribune for the article about racial covenants in Ramsey County (“Racial covenants span St. Paul”, January 16). The article, however, omitted key information. The reason most Ramsey County deeds containing race pacts “appear to have been recorded in the 1920s and 1940s” is that racial segregation became official federal government policy during that time. As part of the New Deal, the Federal Housing Administration refused to insure any mortgages in or near racially integrated neighborhoods and required there to be a racial pact in order to qualify for federal coverage. Thus, real estate developers would have found it difficult, if not impossible, in the midst of the Great Depression to build homes without a racial pact or for individuals to obtain a loan without a racial pact. In 1944, after World War II, the Veterans Administration adopted these same racist policies in the administration of its home loan program for returning veterans.

It is important to recognize that the racial pacts described in the article were not simply the decision of ordinary citizens. These racial pacts and the segregation of American cities were the direct result of government policy. These policies have also denied people of color access to credit and other wealth-building tools, including thousands of veterans who fought for this country overseas and were denied the benefits granted to white veterans. For more information, read “The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America” by Richard Rothstein and “Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America” by Beryl Satter.

Mark Ireland, St. Paul

The author is a district court judge.

•••

For example, the Mapping Prejudice Project uncovered racial covenants in old real estate documents — which have been legally unenforceable in Minnesota for nearly 70 years. A question for the “6,000 volunteers scouring the deeds” for progressive homeowners to proudly declare their distaste for the dusty papers in their home’s title history: Couldn’t their volunteer time be better spent solving of the current appalling racial inequalities in Minneapolis and St. Paul? , rather than chasing away the ghosts of our distant past? Perhaps tutoring children from underprivileged backgrounds or supporting fundraising efforts for businesses owned by black entrepreneurs, for example.

Jerry Anderson, Eagan

INDIGENOUS RITUAL

It has been reported (“Schools Consider Native Ritual”, June 15) that St. Paul Public Schools is considering a new policy allowing and encouraging the Native American practice of smudging – the burning of sage or other sacred herbs. for healing – at schools and events in the state’s second-largest district. Reports indicate that the purification is cultural and not religious in nature. This is belied by the claim that it is sacred herbs that are burned. This indicates a religious nature.

It is admirable that people learn about indigenous culture and beliefs, and Native American children need to feel like they belong, but I believe that allowing, even encouraging, the practice of smudging, an indigenous religious practice, opens up the door to allowing all religious practices in public schools – a bad idea and unconstitutional under the US Constitution.

Carolyn Landry, Hudson, Wis.

•••

So good that St. Paul Public Schools is considering allowing Native American smudging rituals, burning sage and other sacred herbs to heal positive energy replacing negative thoughts. There may be some resistance to this from advocates of separation of church and state, but why not extend this to all religious belief systems? Christians could have daily communion prayer services, Muslims their daily prayer times, Jewish worship, Bible studies, intellectual studies, etc. … something to suit everyone’s needs.

Thirty minutes of free time could be added to each school day providing something for everyone, including study or group discussion time for non-attendees. Special holy days could be recognized for all denominations. Students could be invited to participate in each ritual as a unique opportunity to learn all religious practices, and our understanding of community diversity would be all the better for this privilege.

Michael Tillemans, Minneapolis

•••

In considering allowing the Indigenous practice of smudging, I caution school districts to consider some possible ramifications. Although I have no objection to the practice or transmission of cultural rituals, it could be interpreted by some as a religious practice. This opens the door to other groups seeking to accept their rituals. Personally, I have no problem with students expressing their beliefs or opinions, which is a constitutional right, but the consideration in this case is, what practices and activities will the school district decide to be allowed or not? What would schools decide if a Wiccan practice was promoted as a cultural practice as opposed to a religious practice? How does the practice of students holding prayer meetings on campus fit into this discussion? Disclaimer: I was part of a group that held Bible studies on campus, during lunch breaks, or before school as a high school student in the 1970s.

Again, I’m just advising school districts to be careful when determining what is a cultural practice versus a religious practice – and what is cultural that some might interpret as religious.

Jay Lawton, Willmar, Minn.

THE UNITED NATIONS

Is there a better question than “United Nations – irrelevant?” (Star Tribune review online, June 7.)

How about: What is the UN?

A metaphor might help. It would be an image we can view outside of the uniquely shaped UN building with flags outside and a large council chamber inside.

The metaphor can be a campfire. Around this campfire, people around the world are having conversations about “finding ways to strengthen all citizens’ desire for peace and justice”, in the words of Stu Ackman of the United Nations Association of Minnesota (our local UN campfire).

Thousands of years ago, around campfires, we learned from each other’s daily discoveries to search for what was out there, what was safe, what was not, which way led to a future, which did not.

Gazing into the glow of prehistoric embers, we discovered our most important tool: conversation. We’ve learned that if we beat around the bush, what’s in the bush will probably eat us up.

We learned that not having a conversation is more threatening than the conversation.

Today, we still fall prey to what exists, but much less than if we didn’t have campfire-type places of conversation. We instinctively know that a campfire is a great place to have a conversation. We tend to listen to each other around a campfire, even more so, perhaps, in the dark.

In the light of the United Nations campfire, we can keep alive the hope that we find ways to strengthen the desire for peace and justice of all citizens.

Wever weeds, Long Lake

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Barnes & Thornburg chooses a partner https://himspairport.com/barnes-thornburg-chooses-a-partner/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 13:15:06 +0000 https://himspairport.com/barnes-thornburg-chooses-a-partner/ Scott Dienes. Courtesy of Barnes & Thornburg National full-service business law firm Barnes & Thornburg has elevated Scott Dienes to partner status. Dienes, based in the firm’s Grand Rapids office, is a real estate, municipal and public finance attorney who assists clients with complex projects that often define and shape communities. He represents land owners […]]]>
Scott Dienes. Courtesy of Barnes & Thornburg

National full-service business law firm Barnes & Thornburg has elevated Scott Dienes to partner status.

Dienes, based in the firm’s Grand Rapids office, is a real estate, municipal and public finance attorney who assists clients with complex projects that often define and shape communities.

He represents land owners and developers regarding zoning and land use, brownfield redevelopment, water and sewer, drainage and related matters. He has been general counsel to municipal clients throughout his career and is regularly hired as special counsel by local governments.

Dienes also advises on various public finance matters and manages residential, commercial and industrial real estate projects on behalf of local governments and private landowners.

He also consults with higher education institutions on matters such as financial restructurings, staff reductions, internal investigations, strategic planning, major real estate transactions, the establishment and closure of satellite campuses, solar law and the search for key executives.

Dienes received his JD from Cooley Law School at Western Michigan University and his BA from Siena Heights University.

With more than 700 lawyers and other legal professionals, Barnes & Thornburg is one of the largest law firms in the country. The company serves customers worldwide from offices in Atlanta, Boston, California, Chicago, Delaware, Indiana, Michigan, Minneapolis, New York, Ohio, North Carolina, Salt Lake City, Texas and Washington, DC.

More information on btlaw.com or on Twitter.

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Peter Kenyon to lead consortium to try to buy Everton https://himspairport.com/peter-kenyon-to-lead-consortium-to-try-to-buy-everton/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:37:00 +0000 https://himspairport.com/peter-kenyon-to-lead-consortium-to-try-to-buy-everton/ Everton have not commented on the talks, but any takeover may not be good news for chairman Bill Kenwright. The 76-year-old has held his position since 1989 but has become the target of criticism from Everton fans and Moshiri last week apologized to supporters for mistakes in a season in which the club slipped away […]]]>

Everton have not commented on the talks, but any takeover may not be good news for chairman Bill Kenwright. The 76-year-old has held his position since 1989 but has become the target of criticism from Everton fans and Moshiri last week apologized to supporters for mistakes in a season in which the club slipped away narrowly to relegation from the Premier League.

Everton and Moshiri were forced to cut all business ties with Alisher Usmanov after he was sanctioned by the government following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

The club’s multiple sponsorship ties with companies associated with the Uzbekistan-born billionaire have been terminated and last week a new record club sponsorship with casino and sports betting firm Stake.com was announced, prompting a new examination.

“It hasn’t been good enough and we have to do better”

Moshiri, who has overseen spending of more than £500million since joining Everton in 2016, wrote an open letter to supporters which read: “It hasn’t been good enough and we need to do better. Mistakes were made and for that I want to apologize to all of you.”

The British-Iranian businessman also reaffirmed his commitment to deliver a “fully funded” new stadium at Bramley Moore Dock, which is currently under construction, while pledging not to make the same mistakes in the market for transfers which led to the club posting combined losses of £372million over three seasons.

“The stadium alone will not help us achieve our goals and we are committed to not making the same mistakes again, including the fact that we have not always spent large sums wisely,” he said. he declares.

“You have given us incredible support that has helped us cross the line when we needed it most, and we need to repay that support and show that lessons have been learned.”

Regardless of a proposed takeover, Lampard hopes to sign up to five new players this summer. James Tarkowski has agreed a free transfer after his contract with Burnley expired and there is interest in Chelsea midfielders Conor Gallagher and Billy Gilmour, as well as Tottenham Hotspur’s Harry Winks.

Spurs are ready to offer Winks and Lucas Moura as part of a signing offer for Richarlison, who Everton value at over £50m.

Kenyon always wanted to ‘paint the world blue’ – now Everton could be the beneficiary

by James Ducker

It was in 2005, shortly after the club clinched their first top-flight title in half a century, that Peter Kenyon explained how Chelsea wanted to ‘paint the world blue’. If the consortium that the former managing director of Chelsea and Manchester United manages to buy another club that plays in blue, we suspect that the ambitions for Everton may be more circumspect. But there is no doubt the downtrodden neighbor of Merseyside needs some fresh thinking and some of Kenyon’s recent rhetoric will no doubt ring with Everton fans desperate to see an end to the dysfunction and reckless spending that nearly saw the club relegated from the Premier League last season.

In an interview with Telegraph Sport just under two years ago, Kenyon explained how he tells all prospective club owners that while it undoubtedly costs money to build good teams, it alone is not a guarantee of success. “It goes way beyond a coach or a footballer,” he said. “It is a culture that is created”. Everton, bereft of a vision or a plan under Farhad Moshiri and plagued by constant managerial upheaval and people pulling in different directions, have been as good an example as any of how not to run a football club these last time.

Kenyon, of course, will know. It has been almost two decades since he left United for Stamford Bridge in what remains arguably the most eye-catching managerial change the Premier League has seen and nine years since he parted ways with Chelsea. Nonetheless, he remains a familiar face to many and, although not as present these days, his influence in footballing circles has never waned and his opinions and expertise are still sought after. His company, Opto Advisers, has been involved in the Paris Saint-Germain and Wolverhampton Wanderers takeovers and he has worked with clubs from Middlesbrough to Atletico Madrid. If things had worked out differently, he might even have ended up managing Newcastle United just for the bid he was helping to fail.

Kenyon has a close bond with arguably the most powerful agent in the world, Jorge Mendes, a relationship that dates back to 2003 when they first met over the deal that took Cristiano Ronaldo from Sporting Lisbon to Old Trafford, a year he also oversaw the sale of David Beckham to Real Madrid.

Born in Stalybridge, a small town in Tameside, Greater Manchester, Kenyon made a name for himself as managing director of sports manufacturer Umbro, before leaving to become assistant managing director at United in 1997 and helping to raise the club commercially, securing groundbreaking deals with Vodafone and Nike and significantly raising United’s profile in Asia. Roman Abramovich recognized Kenyon’s talents and one of his first major actions as owner of Chelsea was to lure him to west London.

Given his background it would be easy to fit Kenyon into a certain stereotype, but he was a staunch opponent of a European Super League long before that particular plot crumbled and burned and has an unwavering faith in the collective model of the Premier League where wealth is shared. He also opposes UEFA’s Financial Fair Play rules.

When he first joined Chelsea, Kenyon said they ‘had good players, big players… but it was a disparate group and nothing held it together’ and there are clear parallels to Everton, where manager Frank Lampard faces a huge job to revamp a Frankenstein squad. Takeovers can often mean bad news for incumbents, but if Kenyon’s group were successful, Lampard might have less to fear than most. He knows Kenyon well from their time at Chelsea. Kenyon has also publicly defended Lampard’s credentials when he was manager at Stamford Bridge. Time will tell if this meeting will materialize.

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Real estate tech startup gets $12.5 million https://himspairport.com/real-estate-tech-startup-gets-12-5-million/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 20:04:57 +0000 https://himspairport.com/real-estate-tech-startup-gets-12-5-million/ Wire fraud is on the rise and poses a major threat to the real estate industry, but a Grand Rapids-based startup has secured a significant investment in its efforts to help prevent scams. CertifID, which serves as a digital identity and device verification solution, was launched in 2017 to combat electronic real estate fraud. The […]]]>

Wire fraud is on the rise and poses a major threat to the real estate industry, but a Grand Rapids-based startup has secured a significant investment in its efforts to help prevent scams.

CertifID, which serves as a digital identity and device verification solution, was launched in 2017 to combat electronic real estate fraud. The company helps protect the transactions of title agents, law firms, lenders, realtors, buyers and sellers.

Today, five years later, CertifID closed a Series A funding round with an investment of $12.5 million.

Funding comes from Arthur Ventures, a growth capital firm in Minneapolis, Minnesota. With this round, CertifID has the capital it needs to continue growing while protecting businesses and consumers from electronic fraud – something co-founders Thomas Cronkright and Lawrence Duthler understand firsthand.

Cronkright

“CertifID was basically born out of an incident of wire fraud,” said Cronkright, who is also executive chairman of CertifID and co-founder and owner of Sun Title with Duthler.

In 2015, Sun Title suffered a wire fraud loss of nearly $200,000 after a scam. Cronkright said the agency was asked to assist in title work for the sale of a gas station in southeast Grand Rapids.

After receiving and depositing a deposit check into an escrow account, the agency received a request to transfer the funds. It turned out to be a fraudulent application by scammers posing as the buyer and seller.

The scam resulted in two years of civil litigation before Cronkright said he was subpoenaed as a key witness in a federal criminal trial.

The scammers targeting Sun Title were part of an international crime syndicate based in Nigeria. Cronkright testified in open court against the organization’s second-in-command for its North American chapter, which was known to use business email compromise (BEC) systems.

In the end, 34 convictions resulted from the trial. Sun Title was able to recover $140,000 of its lost funds, although legal fees amounted to $100,000.

The experience led to the development of CertifID and the desire of its founders to prevent the same situation from happening to other business owners.

“We never could have foreseen that this type of crime and this type of bad energy would hit Grand Rapids,” Cronkright said. “At the time, nobody was talking about real estate fraud.”

Attention to electronic fraud and other online scams is perhaps more important than ever. According to the FBI’s 2021 Internet Crime Report, the United States experienced an unprecedented amount of malicious cyber activity last year.

The agency’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) received a record 847,376 complaints from the public, an increase of 7% from 2020. Total potential losses from scams topped $6.9 billion of dollars.

Of the 2,021 complaints received, BEC was one of the top commonly reported incidents.

BEC scams are typically conducted when business email accounts are compromised through social engineering or computer intrusion techniques, resulting in unauthorized funds transfers like the incident with Sun Title.

These types of schemes alone resulted in 19,954 complaints in 2021 with an adjusted loss of nearly $2.4 billion.

For the real estate industry specifically, the American Land Title Association’s 2021 Wire Fraud and Cyber ​​Crime Survey found that a third of all real estate transactions in 2020 were targeted by scammers. Seventy-one percent of stolen funds had not been fully recovered as of March 2021.

Adam

“Fraud is at an all-time high as global criminal networks take advantage of the shift to virtual communications and electronic transfers triggered during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Tyler Adams, co-founder and CEO of CertifID.

Cronkright said this shift to virtual communications along with recent trends in the real estate industry have created a “perfect storm” for scammers, who tend to thrive on disruption.

“In real estate, not only do you have price increases, but you have historically low supply,” Cronkright said. “Historically low supply has led to more buyers offering cash financing rather than mortgage financing to make their deals more competitive.”

However, Cronkright said these types of buyers are bigger targets for fraud when transferring such a large amount.

As more cash buyers are targeted by scammers, Cronkright also said his team has seen more securities firms threatened by scammers posing as sellers, much like the wire fraud incident. by SunTitle.

“This type of activity, unfortunately, happens at a fairly steady pace,” he said. “Grand Rapids is no safer than any other part of the country.”

In response to the rise in scams and the need for help from victims of fraud, CertifID launched in 2021 a Fraud Recovery Services team in partnership with the United States Secret Service.

The team provides rapid response services, which Cronkright says is helpful for those who don’t know where to start in the event of wire fraud.

“Once they have an incident they don’t know what to do – there’s just no playbook,” he said. “There is no muscle memory for a cheating incident.”

Since last year, the team has helped 190 victims of fraud and reimbursed nearly $50 million from fraudulent accounts.

Overall, CertifID has protected over $150 billion in transactions since its inception. With Series A funding, the startup can expand its reach while continuing to deliver solutions.

“With the support of Arthur Ventures, we will be able to double down on our efforts to hire and retain exceptional talent,” Adams said.

For Cronkright, selecting Arthur Ventures was the ideal fit in terms of culture, leadership and experience.

CertifID will welcome Patrick Meenan, General Partner of Arthur Ventures, to its Board of Directors.

“CertifID addresses the biggest threat to the real estate industry,” Meenan said. “They have developed a unique suite of products to prevent fraud and a quick-response recovery team to support businesses and consumers who experience loss. We are thrilled to support such an impressive and mission-driven team.

While the technology component of CertifID is a key part of its fraud prevention efforts, education is equally important. Cronkright said it was crucial for industry players to exercise caution when sending emails and conducting transactions.

“You should be suspicious of any email,” he said. “You actually have to assume that when it comes to exchanging payment information or bills, someone’s email has been compromised.”

Cronkright also stressed the importance of having a system in place to verify identities and ensure banking information is connected to the correct person.

With all the changes in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, he said it can be easy to get used to scams involving urgent payment requests or new changes in banking information.

“The whole 24-month period that we’ve been through has adapted to changes that we haven’t seen in our generations,” he said. “That’s all we’ve adjusted to…and at a time when we should be more suspicious, I’d say what we’ve been through as a society has let our guard down, and that’s an area where we need to take a step back and raise our guard.

He said the CertifID team will use this new capital to continue preventing the impact of wire fraud for their customers and the customers their customers serve.

“We are grateful for the overwhelming confidence of our customers, partners, early investors and now the team at Arthur Ventures,” Cronkright said. “We look forward to continuing our dedication to a world where businesses and consumers can make electronic payments without fear of loss.”

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NAI Legacy Completes Sale of $3.4 Million Land Lease to Raising Cane https://himspairport.com/nai-legacy-completes-sale-of-3-4-million-land-lease-to-raising-cane/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 22:29:00 +0000 https://himspairport.com/nai-legacy-completes-sale-of-3-4-million-land-lease-to-raising-cane/ Property of Raising Cane Chicken Fingers Net rental investment MINNEAPOLIS, MN, USA, June 7, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — NAI Legacy is pleased to announce that it has completed the sale of 3065 White Bear Ave, Maplewood, Minnesota. The brand new construction, single-tenant property, has been ground leased to Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers at Maplewood Mall for […]]]>

Property of Raising Cane Chicken Fingers

Net rental investment

MINNEAPOLIS, MN, USA, June 7, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — NAI Legacy is pleased to announce that it has completed the sale of 3065 White Bear Ave, Maplewood, Minnesota. The brand new construction, single-tenant property, has been ground leased to Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers at Maplewood Mall for over 15 years.

Michael Houge, Managing Director of NAI Legacy, said, “We knew Raising Cane’s would be very attractive to 1031 investors, and by marketing it widely, we ended up with several interested buyers and had a ‘bidding effect’ that allowed our seller to deliver a better price than our asking price.

The American fast food chain specializing in chicken fingers was founded in 1996 in Raton Rouge, Louisiana. They have since expanded to over 600 locations across the United States (2022), with over 3,100 employees. The private company generated $1.5 billion in revenue in 2020 (Forbes). Their income has tripled in just four years, thanks in part to their rapid response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The momentum they started during this time has continued.

Michael Houge of NAI Legacy represented the seller and Ken Tsukahara of Colliers represented the California-based investor.

About NAI Legacy
NAI Legacy is the tax-efficient investment platform of the NAI global network. NAI Legacy operates as both a provider of real estate investment products and investment services. Our investment division offers our clients tax-efficient real estate investment solutions such as Delaware Statutory Trust (DST) offerings, funds, and direct investment opportunities. Our services division provides clients with comprehensive investment solutions through brokerage, property management and accounting. Through our affiliation with the NAI Global Network, we have direct access to all major US markets with over 300 offices. Our unique product and service offerings backed by a national network allow us to directly tailor investment services to a client’s unique investment criteria across asset classes, geography, risk tolerance and investment preferences.

Create your Legacy with us by contacting invest@nailegacy.com

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Amelia Bjorklund
INA’s legacy
+1 952-491-3069
amelia@nailegacy.com
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