Minneapolis – Himspairport http://himspairport.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:00:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://himspairport.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Minneapolis – Himspairport http://himspairport.com/ 32 32 Zoning issues: 18th Avenue NE and Central Avenue https://himspairport.com/zoning-issues-18th-avenue-ne-and-central-avenue/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:00:33 +0000 https://himspairport.com/zoning-issues-18th-avenue-ne-and-central-avenue/ Editor’s note: This article is part of the ongoing Neighbors for More Neighbors (N4MN) discussion of current zoning changes due to the implementation of the Minneapolis 2040 plan and advocacy to allow more uses in more places to support complete quarters. It was written by Zachary Wajda and published by Brit Anbacht with his permission. […]]]>

Editor’s note: This article is part of the ongoing Neighbors for More Neighbors (N4MN) discussion of current zoning changes due to the implementation of the Minneapolis 2040 plan and advocacy to allow more uses in more places to support complete quarters. It was written by Zachary Wajda and published by Brit Anbacht with his permission.

I live in the Northeast Park neighborhood in Minneapolis. I recently bought a house here and don’t own a car. It’s one of my personal goals to stay car-free. It should be possible for anyone living in a big city to do this. Everyone should have easy and convenient access to what they need in life. For me, some of those things are food, jobs, and hobbies.

Before moving home, I lived in downtown Minneapolis. I was working 15 minutes (walking distance) from my house. I lived less than a block from a convenience store. I could leave, do my shopping and be back in my apartment in 10 minutes. I frequented Minneapolis’ beautiful Mississippi River and the fantastic restaurants just minutes away.

My new home is just south of 18th Ave NE and Central Avenue NE. It is in a large R2B core zoning district (up to three residential units), and it is in an Interior 2 built form overlay district. All core residential zonings (R1, R2, R3, R4, R5 , R6) do not support most commercial uses. Small convenience stores and restaurants are prohibited. 18th Avenue NE is sandwiched between Central Avenue NE and Johnson Street NE. The famous Sociable Cider Werks brewery is next door, and the Great Northern Greenway at 18th Avenue runs parallel to it.

Photo of 18th Avenue NE “Great Northern Greenway” facing Central Avenue. Photo by Zachary Wajda.

18th Avenue NE is a great example of why these types of small businesses should be allowed in urban neighborhood zoning. This street is an ideal location for small shops and services. People who live there should be able to legally operate a business from their home to take advantage of the great greenway and access to public transit. Will the new zoning code allow these small businesses here? Or will they be limited to existing corridors? If the city wants complete neighborhoods, claimed in Minneapolis 2040, it must legalize the uses people need in every corner of the city.

To be clear, I’m not advocating strip malls or big box stores in Minneapolis neighborhoods. We already have many examples of small businesses nestled in neighborhoods. I’m not advocating rezoning 18th Avenue. I would like the city to think about the uses that are permitted in the new primary neighborhoods of the “urban neighborhood”. Part of what makes a neighborhood a neighborhood is a sense of community. A sense of community is built in local stores, hangouts, hangouts and recreation areas. Should swaths of our city be more than a 10-minute walk from the nearest hypothetical legal convenience store?

I call on Minneapolis to expand permitted uses in residential areas to include the foundations of a complete, walkable neighborhood. Enable owners to run businesses from their homes. Allow small everyday retail businesses, such as grocery stores, hairdressers and dentists in our neighborhoods.

Take action!

Which can you to support complete neighborhoods in Minneapolis?

  • Take the full Neighbors for More Neighbors neighborhood survey!
  • Volunteer with the N4MN Minneapolis 2040 Implementation Task Force!
  • Share your email to receive action alerts on this project
  • Discuss with your neighbors and friends what complete neighborhoods are and why they are important to you.
  • Sign up for the N4MN newsletter and watch for action alerts from the working group; they may include attending community meetings, testifying at hearings, or sending emails.

Written by Zachary Wajda. Posted by Brit Anbacht.

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Friends and family celebrate Tekle Sundberg’s birthday https://himspairport.com/friends-and-family-celebrate-tekle-sundbergs-birthday/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 02:40:19 +0000 https://himspairport.com/friends-and-family-celebrate-tekle-sundbergs-birthday/ Community members and family and friends of Tekle Sundberg gathered in George Floyd Square late afternoon to celebrate his 21st birthday. Tekle was fatally shot by Minneapolis police on July 14 after a six-hour standoff that Tekle’s family said was triggered by a mental health crisis. Tekle’s life was celebrated with a performance by the […]]]>



Community members and family and friends of Tekle Sundberg gathered in George Floyd Square late afternoon to celebrate his 21st birthday. Tekle was fatally shot by Minneapolis police on July 14 after a six-hour standoff that Tekle’s family said was triggered by a mental health crisis.

Tekle’s life was celebrated with a performance by the Solidarity Brass Band. His family and members of his community, including Toshira Garraway and representatives from Communities United Against Police Brutality, also addressed crowds on Chicago Avenue South and East 38th Street, where Minneapolis police murdered George Floyd in 2020. Local artist Leslie Barlow displayed a painting of Tekle at the rally. .

Tekle’s sister Kelsey Romero led the band singing the song “This Little Light of Mine”. Then she said she wanted Tekle to be remembered as a brilliant spirit who cared deeply about the earth, the animals, and his brothers and sisters.

Tekle was a deep thinker who had the hope and dream of becoming a carpenter, she said. Romero described his brother as a unique and beautiful soul who stood up for others even through his own pain, and was there with others who were also struggling.

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Woman identifies her son, 19, shot and killed in Minneapolis, who came to the US as a toddler during a breakthrough adoption https://himspairport.com/woman-identifies-her-son-19-shot-and-killed-in-minneapolis-who-came-to-the-us-as-a-toddler-during-a-breakthrough-adoption/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 19:14:25 +0000 https://himspairport.com/woman-identifies-her-son-19-shot-and-killed-in-minneapolis-who-came-to-the-us-as-a-toddler-during-a-breakthrough-adoption/ The 19-year-old man who was shot and killed over the weekend in Minneapolis was identified by his mother on Monday as her son whose arrival from Ethiopia as a toddler marked a breakthrough in adoption international. Connor Yoseph Green, of Minneapolis, was the man who was shot Saturday morning while in his car on the […]]]>

The 19-year-old man who was shot and killed over the weekend in Minneapolis was identified by his mother on Monday as her son whose arrival from Ethiopia as a toddler marked a breakthrough in adoption international.

Connor Yoseph Green, of Minneapolis, was the man who was shot Saturday morning while in his car on the 4700 block of N. Lyndale Avenue, Diane Rupert said.

Green was dropping a friend off at his house late that morning when the gunfire broke out, Rupert said. A car he had just bought crashed seconds after the shooting and the friend performed CPR until help arrived, she said.

Connor Green died at HCMC on the same day, police said. There have been no arrests in connection with the shooting that brought newly sworn in police chief Brian O’Hara to the scene.

“We believe a second vehicle pulled over and fired multiple shots” at the victim’s car, said O’Hara, the newly sworn in Minneapolis police chief, who was alerted by the ShotSpotter app more than a dozen shots. “It’s absolutely outrageous.”

Rupert said Connor was adopted in April 2004 at 14 months old through the Ethiopian Adoption Program, a pilot project of Children’s Home Society and Family Services in St. Paul.

His adoption and another at the same time were the first through the Minnesota Families Program. At the time, Minnesota was one of four states – along with Indiana, Massachusetts and Washington – newly cleared by the Ethiopian government for adoption, according to the US State Department.

Connor Green’s older brother, Drew, joined the family from South Korea, also by adoption.

Connor Green graduated from Brooklyn Center High School and “was enrolled at Des Moines Area Community College but worked a little more” as a furniture mover to save even more money, Rupert said.

In July, Connor Green was charged in the Hennepin County District with second-degree rioting with a dangerous weapon in connection with a shooting at Brooklyn Center on July 6. More than 100 shots were fired at the scene in the 5800 block of N. Xerxes Avenue. . Both men were seen with firearms and later arrested, police said.

911 callers said two groups of people were shooting at each other in the parking lot, police said. Several apartments and vehicles were damaged by bullets, but no one was injured, police added.

Green was released from jail two days later after posting $20,000 bond. He was due back in court on Wednesday.

Police are urging anyone with information about Green’s death to call CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). Tips can also be submitted at CrimeStoppersMN.org. Information leading to an arrest and conviction may qualify for a reward.

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Minneapolis invests in street lighting as a way to fight crime https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-invests-in-street-lighting-as-a-way-to-fight-crime/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 04:45:41 +0000 https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-invests-in-street-lighting-as-a-way-to-fight-crime/ Minneapolis invests in street lighting as a way to fight crime Millions of dollars are being invested in a major public safety initiative in Minneapolis, and it has nothing to do with law enforcement. MINNEAPOLIS (FOX 9) – Millions of dollars are pouring into a major public safety initiative in Minneapolis, and it has nothing […]]]>

Millions of dollars are pouring into a major public safety initiative in Minneapolis, and it has nothing to do with law enforcement.

Mayor Jacob Frey set aside $9 million for citywide lighting upgrades in the 2023-24 budget. City officials hope increased lighting will deter crime.

“It looks small but it’s huge,” said Ward Four council member Latrisha Vetaw. “To keep all the streetlights working, shining – it’s the least I can do as a council member.”

Vetaw invented the “Get Lit Minneapolis” initiative and says it’s a workable, proven solution that can improve safety immediately.

“We get reports in my office that no lights are working on some streets and that’s not okay,” she said.

While lighting makes people feel safer, studies show it reduces crime. In 2016, New York City increased lighting in some public housing projects and saw a significant drop in serious crime.

Vetaw said it won’t replace an increased police presence, but it’s a start.

Upgrades include adding lights, replacing old bulbs with brighter LEDs, and fixing broken poles.

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Minneapolis Restaurant serves exclusively Native cuisine https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-restaurant-serves-exclusively-native-cuisine/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 05:32:00 +0000 https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-restaurant-serves-exclusively-native-cuisine/ “As you may know, it’s a wonderful, beautiful, and sacred space, and we’re thrilled to have a restaurant that’s extremely unique and sort of the only one like it,” Sherman told ICT. Unsurprisingly, Owamni has become one of the toughest restaurants in Minneapolis to get a reservation (per IllinoisTimes). Owamni prides itself on its diverse […]]]>

“As you may know, it’s a wonderful, beautiful, and sacred space, and we’re thrilled to have a restaurant that’s extremely unique and sort of the only one like it,” Sherman told ICT. Unsurprisingly, Owamni has become one of the toughest restaurants in Minneapolis to get a reservation (per IllinoisTimes).

Owamni prides itself on its diverse team and the dishes are prepared using ingredients considered pre-colonial. that means no wheat flour, dairy, cane sugar, chicken, pork, or beef. Instead, the restaurant supports local and national Indigenous food producers and crafts dishes around ingredients like fish, birds, insects, wild plants and varieties from ancestral Native American farms – food sources originally found on earth (via Owamni). The restaurant’s menu is also listed online in Dakota.

Dishes on the menu include trout served with a white bean spread, porridge made with Ute Mountain blue corn, maple, hazelnut and berries, and Choginyapi corn sandwiches filled with mashed elk, sweet potato or vegetables of your choice. For dessert, the maple chaga cake features wojape, candied berries and nuts, or Sunbutter Bars squash, agave, caramel and toasted sunflower seeds in a colorful presentation.

Because reservations are hard to score, plan ahead. There’s a reason the restaurant snagged the James Beard Award for Best New Restaurant.

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Jobs report shows why more rate hikes are needed – WIZM 92.3FM 1410AM https://himspairport.com/jobs-report-shows-why-more-rate-hikes-are-needed-wizm-92-3fm-1410am/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 09:54:04 +0000 https://himspairport.com/jobs-report-shows-why-more-rate-hikes-are-needed-wizm-92-3fm-1410am/ WASHINGTON (AP) — The strong U.S. jobs report for October underscores why the Federal Reserve needs to raise interest rates higher than previously expected in order to control inflation, said Friday Neel Kashkari, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. In an interview with The Associated Press, Kashkari said that at the Fed’s next […]]]>

WASHINGTON (AP) — The strong U.S. jobs report for October underscores why the Federal Reserve needs to raise interest rates higher than previously expected in order to control inflation, said Friday Neel Kashkari, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Kashkari said that at the Fed’s next meeting in December, he plans to issue a higher forecast for the central bank’s benchmark rate next year than he does. did in September. He declined to specify the rate he envisaged for 2023.

Friday’s jobs data showed hiring is “pretty healthy” despite some slowdown in recent months, Kashkari said.

“It tells me that we still have work to do to try to cool the economy and balance supply and demand,” he added.

The Fed has raised its short-term policy rate six times this year, the last four times by an unusually high three-quarters point, in a strenuous effort to rein in inflation. Prices are accelerating at nearly the fastest rate in four decades.

To achieve this goal, the central bank hopes to moderate consumer and business spending, slow hiring and reduce economic growth. Still, the risk is growing that the Fed could go so far as to tip the economy into a recession.

Kashkari generally supported higher rates. He has taken a hawkish line with inflation this year, having expressed more dovish sentiments in the past. (“Hawks” generally support higher rates to curb inflation, while “doves” generally prefer lower rates to support hiring.)

On Wednesday, after the Fed’s latest policy meeting, Chairman Jerome Powell opened the door to smaller rate hikes in the months ahead. He added that a half-point hike could come at the Fed’s next meeting in December or early next year.

But Powell also warned that the Fed would likely raise its key rate higher than it had expected in September – a sentiment Kashkari echoed on Friday.

Every quarter, the Fed publishes economic and political projections. In September, central bank officials expected to raise their short-term rate to around 4.6% by the end of 2023. It now sits in a range of 3.75% to 4%, its all-time high. level in 14 years.

“I had interest rates in September peaking at around 4.9% in the March-April (2023) period,” Kashkari said in the interview. “Given what I know right now, I would expect to go higher than that. How much higher than that, I don’t know.

After its Wednesday meeting, the Fed said in a statement that when making decisions on future rate hikes, it would take into account the impact of its previous increases and the fact that it may take time for rates to rise. Fed policies affect the economy.

Economists saw this as an acknowledgment that previous Fed increases have yet to have their full impact and that Fed officials are more willing to give their policies time to work, rather than rack up bigger rate hikes.

“The Fed is starting to come out of a corner,” said Claudia Sahm, founder of Sahm Consulting and former Fed economist. References in the Fed’s Wednesday statement to lags between its rate hikes and their impact “were an acknowledgment that ultimately what they did should have a noticeable effect on inflation next year.”

Kashkari said he doesn’t think another three-quarter point rise in December is “out of order”. But he also said the Fed had taken significant steps to fight inflation and that it was appropriate to consider a slower rate of increase.

“Four (three-quarter point rises) in a row is a lot of tightening in a short time,” he said. “At some point it will be appropriate to step down” at a half point and then at some point after that at a quarter point, Kashkari added.

Powell said Wednesday that the Fed would not need to see signs of falling inflation to scale back its rate hikes. But Kashkari said upcoming employment and inflation data would affect his decision.

The Minneapolis Fed chairman noted that there were signs that inflation could ease next year, such as a marked slowdown in home sales and lower rent increases. But he also said he saw no evidence that underlying inflation – which is driven more by rising wages and prices for services, such as medical care – is improving.

That’s why Fed officials would generally like to see some weakening in job and wage growth.

“We want people to find jobs,” Kashkari said. “But for me, we also need to see evidence that the labor market is softening at least a bit. I don’t see much evidence of this.

Separately, Susan Collins, the new chairwoman of the Boston Federal Reserve, said in remarks Friday that October’s strong jobs report doesn’t necessarily signal a strong economy.

Consumer spending measures and employment data “may send somewhat different signals as businesses’ need to fill vacancies may persist even with some slowdown in demand,” Collins said, as some industries have even fewer jobs than before the pandemic. “The continued above-trend payroll growth in this morning’s October jobs report is consistent with that view.”

Collins also said, regarding rate hikes, that “smaller increases will often be appropriate” in future meetings.

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Minneapolis advances plans to demolish rooftop depot | the alley diary https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-advances-plans-to-demolish-rooftop-depot-the-alley-diary/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 20:39:54 +0000 https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-advances-plans-to-demolish-rooftop-depot-the-alley-diary/ Urban Farm supporters testify from the floor of an adjourned city council meeting on September 22, 2022. Only a handful of council members remained to listen to community members, including CMs Chavez, Johnson and Wonsley. Photo: Steve Sandberg By STEVE SANDBERG In a 7-4 vote on Sept. 22, the Minneapolis City Council voted to move […]]]>
Urban Farm supporters testify from the floor of an adjourned city council meeting on September 22, 2022. Only a handful of council members remained to listen to community members, including CMs Chavez, Johnson and Wonsley. Photo: Steve Sandberg

By STEVE SANDBERG

In a 7-4 vote on Sept. 22, the Minneapolis City Council voted to move forward with its request for proposals (RFP) process to select a vendor to demolish the Roof Depot building. Vote 7 for, 4 against, 1 abstention, 1 absent. For: Vetaw, Osman, Jenkins, Palmisano, Goodman, Rainville and Koski. Against: Chavez, Wonsley, Payne and Chugtai. Abstaining: Johnson. Absent: Ellison. East Phillips residents and urban farm supporters have been denied permission to speak at two previous council meetings regarding requests for proposals (RFPs) for the contract demolition of the Roof Depot. This despite the mayor’s repeated promises from July to schedule a meeting with the city’s environmental consultant, Braun Intertec, to address community concerns about how they would be protected from arsenic and other known contaminants. in the event of demolition on the 7.4 acre site. When those present were again denied permission to speak, the President of the Council abruptly adjourned the meeting when testimony from the room began. When the proceedings resumed in the afternoon, the 7-4 vote was echoed by the loud and continuous testimony from the room.

Now, the East Phillips Neighborhood Institute (EPNI) and its allies will hold a series of events to stop the demolition leading up to the council’s expected vote to choose a supplier in November.

Follow EPNI and its actions via social media, join our mailing list: UrbanFarmMpls@googlegroups.com and donate to Protect East Phillips Go Fund Me.

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Minneapolis Century Quilt Stitched with Names of Yesteryear https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-century-quilt-stitched-with-names-of-yesteryear/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 19:01:20 +0000 https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-century-quilt-stitched-with-names-of-yesteryear/ The faded old duvet sat rolled up in a plastic bag for eight years after Pamela Peterman inherited it from her great-aunt Frances. As she unrolled it on her kitchen table in Rosemount on a recent Sunday morning, Peterman pointed out some of the 318 signatures embroidered in the quilt’s blue and white checkered squares. […]]]>

The faded old duvet sat rolled up in a plastic bag for eight years after Pamela Peterman inherited it from her great-aunt Frances. As she unrolled it on her kitchen table in Rosemount on a recent Sunday morning, Peterman pointed out some of the 318 signatures embroidered in the quilt’s blue and white checkered squares.

“It’s a little lumpy and not an example of fine quilt making, but the names on the quilt started to speak to me,” said Peterman, 78, who has spent more than 100 hours in the the rabbit hole of online genealogy research.

She investigated the names sewn into the signature quilt, including her great-aunt Frances Hagander Brazil and Frances’ former roommate Esther Swanson. They were 19, Frances a waitress and Esther a cook, when they lived and worked at the Gardner House Hotel in Hastings.

Then there is the signature of V. Eugene Johnson – a missionary whose family survived a German ship attack in Tanganyika, now the East African nation of Tanzania.

“Look at this one,” Peterman told me, pointing to “Mrs. LW Youngdahl” stitched in blue thread. “It drives me crazy when women use their husband’s name.”

The woman’s full name was Irene Annet Engdahl Youngdahl, a daughter of Swedish immigrants who majored in economics and English at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter’s and graduated in 1919. Four years later, she married Luther Wallace Youngdahl, a fellow Gustie who later became a state Supreme Court justice, federal judge, and 27th governor of Minnesota from 1947 to 1951.

Peterman’s detective answered some – but not all – of the questions surrounding the old quilt.

“The common bond was the Lutheran Church of Messiah,” Peterman said, recalling his family’s Swedish immigrant church in south Minneapolis that opened in 1917 and was razed in 2018. The congregation lives at a nearby community center and at the Minneapolis campus of Minnesota Children’s Hospital. occupies the site where the old altar stood under a splendid stained glass window of Christ with the words “Father, thy will be done”.

Going through a church directory from 1946, Peterman identified many names on the quilt — which she dated to the 1920s based on the birth and death records of the stitched names.

“I would like to know why it was created,” Peterman said. “But my best guess is that it was some sort of fundraiser and maybe people paid a penny to add their name to raise money for the church.”

Peterman received the quilt from his second cousin Barb Brazil Anderson of Minneapolis, who inherited the quilt from her grandmother: Frances Brazil. Frances might have won the quilt in a church raffle, “or she might have spearheaded the whole thing,” Peterman said. “Nobody knows.”

“It’s not a striking quilt, and it’s pretty faded,” said Carolyn Silflow of Roseville, who has documented hundreds of quilts for the Minnesota Quilt Project – a group that has spent decades researching and photographing quilts. quilts in the state.

“Quilts really tell women’s stories because it was a way for women to express their artistic side, while doing something useful,” said Silflow, a retired biology professor from the Institute. University of Minnesota.

Silflow stopped by Peterman earlier this month to check out the signature quilt. She was more impressed with Peterman’s research than the couture.

“She really impressed me with her relentless dedication to finding this quilt,” Silflow said. “The quilt immediately struck me as meaningful with all these names and the history of a church community.”

Silflow said the iconic quilts “are not super rare, but not something we see every day either.” They often raised money for charity, and signatures are usually the only design element in quilts.

Writing for the Minnesota Quilters newsletter, Silflow described the Peterman quilt in quilter parlance: “Made from Jacks on Six blocks (also known as Double X, Old Maid’s Puzzle, Cat’s Cradle). ” She said it was “machine-stitched and hand-quilted” and that the names “seem to be sewn by the same hand.”

Silflow began documenting Minnesota quilts in the early 1990s. His all-time favorite? A Depression-era “Grandmothers Flower Garden Quilt” by Agnes Kueppers of St. Paul that uses 189 different floral-print fabrics in rings of hexagons. Kueppers, who died aged 94 in 1992, won a blue ribbon in 1942 at the State Fair for that one.

Peterman’s quilt probably won’t end up looking so rarefied. But Silflow will submit information about it to the Quilt Index, a Michigan State University database that includes nearly 6,000 Minnesota quilts at tinyurl.com/MNquilts. You can learn more about the Minnesota Quilt Project at tinyurl.com/MNQuiltProject.

“Looking up the names on my quilt has become an obsession for me,” Peterman said, “maybe because it’s not something I have to do, but rather what I want to do.”

Curt Brown’s Tales of Minnesota History appear every Sunday. Readers can send him ideas and suggestions at mnhistory@startribune.com. His latest book looks at Minnesota in 1918, when flu, war, and fires converged: strib.mn/MN1918.

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Minnesota companies see opportunity in rapidly growing pickleball market https://himspairport.com/minnesota-companies-see-opportunity-in-rapidly-growing-pickleball-market/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 10:03:29 +0000 https://himspairport.com/minnesota-companies-see-opportunity-in-rapidly-growing-pickleball-market/ The light game of pickleball is getting serious business. A hybrid of tennis, badminton, and ping-pong, the burgeoning sport is attracting Minnesota bars and building owners who see business opportunities in pickleball courts. Just last week, West Des Moines, Iowa-based Smash Park announced plans to open its first Minnesota location in Roseville next fall and […]]]>

The light game of pickleball is getting serious business.

A hybrid of tennis, badminton, and ping-pong, the burgeoning sport is attracting Minnesota bars and building owners who see business opportunities in pickleball courts.

Just last week, West Des Moines, Iowa-based Smash Park announced plans to open its first Minnesota location in Roseville next fall and is now focusing on a second Twin Cities location. .

“It’s a big pickleball market,” Monty Lockyear, president of Smash Park Entertainment Group, said of the Minneapolis-St. Paul’s region.

The mini-chain of bars and restaurants is both a sports bar and a leisure center. Twin Cities residents encouraged Smash Park to open a location here after visiting its West Des Moines site.

Not to be outdone, Chanhassen-based Life Time Fitness sent out a press release on Tuesday reminding everyone of their dominance on the pickleball court.

“Since August 2021, Life Time has built indoor and outdoor pickleball courts at the rate of five new permanent courts each week from coast to coast,” the company said.

“We’re adding so many courts so fast,” Bahram Akradi, founder and CEO of Life Time, told the Star Tribune. “It’s an important part of our strategy.”

With over 350 permanent indoor and outdoor pickleball courts, Life Time aims to reach over 600 by the end of next year. To do this, the company converts basketball and tennis courts and indoor soccer fields.

That makes Life Time likely the largest operator of permanent courts in the nation, said USA Pickleball, the sport’s national governing body.

“It’s a healthy addiction. It’s cross-generational,” said Chuck Menke, chief marketing officer for Arizona-based USA Pickleball.

Pickleball, created in 1965, has traditionally been seen as a sport for older people, but young people are now drawn to the game, he said. Menke said many entrepreneurs see money in sports.

First & First, a Minneapolis-based commercial real estate company that rehabilitates older properties, is one such company.

Last year, the company took a large empty space in a northeast Minneapolis building and added 12 indoor pickleball courts, becoming the Lucky Shots Pickleball Club.

“We’ve been very busy. The economy has been good,” said Peter Remes, owner of First & First.

Remes plans to add food service to the pickleball courts in the first quarter of next year, with the long-term goal of adding more courts.

And while many chains and operators have significant growth plans, other local businesses view pickleball as a fun add-on rather than a primary focus.

The Minneapolis Cider Co. opened in May 2019, adding indoor pickleball courts several months later.

“We really leaned into it. We do a lot of pickleball-centric events,” said David O’Neill, co-founder of Minneapolis Cider. “Pickleball is a great way to bring people together.”

Minneapolis Cider, located in the Marcy-Holmes neighborhood of Minneapolis, said demand increases when the temperature drops and snow begins to fall.

“Winter is just bananas,” O’Neill said.

The Sports & Fitness Industry Association estimated that there were 4.8 million people playing pickleball in 2021. The number of pickleball players has grown an average of 11.5% per year over the past five years, according to the organization. The SFIA said the North Midwest region, which includes Minnesota, is the fastest growing region in the sport.

While pickleball skeptics see the sport as a passing fad, Life Time’s Akradi disagrees. Before construction began, Akradi noticed club members playing makeshift games of pickleball on the company’s tennis and basketball courts. Once he tried the game for himself, he said he “saw the light” and now plays seven to eight hours of pickleball every week.

The company will spend approximately $25 million through the end of 2023 on the court expansion.

Akradi expects high school athletic programs to start adding pickleball as a sport.

“I think it will become an Olympic sport,” he added.

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Stefon Diggs still remembers who kissed him first after Minneapolis miracle https://himspairport.com/stefon-diggs-still-remembers-who-kissed-him-first-after-minneapolis-miracle/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 18:15:20 +0000 https://himspairport.com/stefon-diggs-still-remembers-who-kissed-him-first-after-minneapolis-miracle/ Star receiver Stefon Diggs, who played a major role in the ‘Minneapolis Miracle,’ recently revealed who was the first person to kiss him after the massive win. Stefon Diggs is a wide receiver for the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League. Earlier, Diggs spent the first four years of his career with the Vikings. […]]]>

Star receiver Stefon Diggs, who played a major role in the ‘Minneapolis Miracle,’ recently revealed who was the first person to kiss him after the massive win.

Stefon Diggs is a wide receiver for the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League. Earlier, Diggs spent the first four years of his career with the Vikings. In 2020, Diggs moved to Buffalo. He signed a huge contract worth $14.4 million a year.

Recently, he discussed all the details of the Minneapolis Miracle in a recent podcast with Von Miller. Von asked Diggs a number of questions related to the miraculous victory and the catcher answered each one with perfection.

Who was the first person you kissed after that?asks Miller. “It was Caleb Jones, he was one of the guys that pulled me through the year,said Diggs.

Indeed, the Minneapolis game was one of the greatest games of all time. When the Vikings blew a 17-point lead over the New Orleans Saints in the Divisional Round, it looked like another disappointing season was coming to an end.

With 10 seconds remaining and Minnesota trailing 24-23, Keenum returned from the 39-yard line. The veteran made a sideline pass to Diggs, who caught the ball at the New Orleans 34-yard line before sprinting into the end zone past Marshal Lattimore.

Read also : TJ Watt injury update: When will Steelers outside linebacker return?

The Minneapolis Miracle Story

The Minneapolis Miracle (also known as the Minnesota Miracle) was the final game of the National Football Conference (NFC) Divisional Playoff game between the Minnesota Vikings and New Orleans Saints on January 14, 2018.

The Saints rallied from a 17-0 first-half deficit to take a 24-23 lead with 25 seconds left. Vikings quarterback Case Keenum threw a 27-yard pass to receiver Stefon Diggs on the final play of the game;

Saints safety Marcus Williams missed a tackle, allowing Diggs to run to the end zone and complete the 61-yard touchdown pass. It was the first time in NFL playoff history that a game ended with a touchdown when time expired.

Without a doubt, it was one of the best games of all time and NFL fans would also expect to see something similar in the current season.

Read also: ‘Calm The F**K Down’: Furious Kyler Murray spotted yelling at coach Kliff Kingsbury during Saints Clash

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