Minneapolis – Himspairport http://himspairport.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:32:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://himspairport.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Minneapolis – Himspairport http://himspairport.com/ 32 32 Deputies pull 47 cats out of stuffy SUV north of Minneapolis https://himspairport.com/deputies-pull-47-cats-out-of-stuffy-suv-north-of-minneapolis/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:32:38 +0000 https://himspairport.com/deputies-pull-47-cats-out-of-stuffy-suv-north-of-minneapolis/ When Chisago County sheriff’s deputies were dispatched June 14 to a truck stop an hour north of Minneapolis, they were told a vehicle was so full of cats its driver couldn’t see out of its windows. . “We literally got there and were like, ‘Oh my God, there’s a lot going on here,'” captain Derek […]]]>

When Chisago County sheriff’s deputies were dispatched June 14 to a truck stop an hour north of Minneapolis, they were told a vehicle was so full of cats its driver couldn’t see out of its windows. .

“We literally got there and were like, ‘Oh my God, there’s a lot going on here,'” captain Derek Anklan said. Coffee or Die Magazine.

First was the “overwhelming smell” emanating from the four-door SUV parked near the Harris County seat, Anklan said. Before the 95-degree afternoon was over, his deputies and the Minnesota State Police would remove 47 cats from the car.

They also learned that Kitty Krusader, an animal rescue group in the nearby town of Mora, had taken in 15 of the same driver’s cats during a Memorial Day visit to a Walmart in Cambridge.

Staff from the Minnesota State Police, Chisago County Sheriff’s Office and the Animal Humane Society work together to rescue 47 cats pulled from a vehicle June 14, 2022, near Harris. Photo courtesy of the Animal Humane Society.

The motorist was not a Chisago County resident, but deputies offered him a deal. If he voluntarily returned his cat cargo, they wouldn’t give him a ticket to Distracted driving or other minor charges, and he could go on his way.

“All things considered, there wasn’t a huge criminal element,” Anklan said. “We found the cats in a safe place, so we moved on.”

Anklan said coffee or die that at first only one cat seemed a bit dehydrated and the others seemed healthy. Their ages ranged from 12 years old to a kitten.

The driver “was right over his head, and there was a resource that could help him with that,” Anklan said. “He agreed it was probably time to hand them over to this agency.”

north of Minneapolis
Two of 47 cats rescued by the Chisago County Sheriff’s Office near Harris, Minnesota on June 14, 2022. Photo courtesy of Animal Humane Society.

The Society for the Protection of Animals in Coon Rapids investigators scrambled to Harris, where they were joined by an organizer from Kitty Krusaders.

Animal Humane Society spokeswoman Sarah Bhimani said coffee or die her non-profit organization wanted to ensure that every cat received ‘individualized care’, so staff members contacted Animal Rescue of Saint Francis of Assisi in Forest Lake and New leash rescue to Cannon Falls for assistance.

“They graciously said ‘yes,’ each taking a handful of cats,” Bhimani said.

Kitty Krusaders announced that eight of the 47 cats in need of ‘the most critical medical attention’ went to Saint Francis of Assisi, which was assisted by the South Shore Veterinary Hospital in Forest Lake.

According to the four rescue groups, the cats have been checked by veterinarians and are being cared for by staff and volunteers. The animals will be sterilized and put up for adoption by local cat lovers.

Rthen read: Firefighters rush to rescue dog trapped in water-filled convertible from canal

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=/yqjbUmpha7E

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Minneapolis Star-Tribune: Airline Passengers Deserve Better | Opinion https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-star-tribune-airline-passengers-deserve-better-opinion/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 09:04:00 +0000 https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-star-tribune-airline-passengers-deserve-better-opinion/ Ironically, the day after US Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg met with airline executives about the massive number of recent flight disruptions and cancellations, his own flight was cancelled, forcing him to travel from Washington, DC, to New York. This underscores the frustration of airline passengers. Ready and eager to finally travel as covid-19 fears have […]]]>

Ironically, the day after US Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg met with airline executives about the massive number of recent flight disruptions and cancellations, his own flight was cancelled, forcing him to travel from Washington, DC, to New York.

This underscores the frustration of airline passengers. Ready and eager to finally travel as covid-19 fears have subsided, passengers are finding themselves victims of overbookings, delays and cancellations as airlines try to recoup lost revenue despite often severe staff shortages which amplify the disturbances.

The options, unfortunately, appear limited, although Buttigieg has said he is ready to take enforcement action against airlines that are underperforming in customer service. We recognize the difficult situation in which the airlines find themselves. Short of income during the worst of the pandemic, they urged many pilots to retire early. Now they are understaffed to keep up with increased consumer demand.

Nevertheless, it’s time to take stock when disruptions become the norm instead of the exception. Passengers in European Union countries have had broad consumer protections in place since 2004. These include compensation when airlines delay or cancel a flight, as well as meals and hotel stays in the event of a delay. of one night.

By contrast, the poor treatment of airline passengers in the United States is an old story that gets worse. As early as 2010, Senator Amy Klobuchar co-sponsored a passenger bill of rights that called for protections so basic you hardly thought they needed to be spelled out. The new rules required airlines to provide passengers with food, water and toilet facilities during extended tarmac delays and limited the amount of time they could be forced to occupy a plane to three hours. It came after a series of horrific stories of passengers being trapped on planes for hours waiting for clearance to take off.

Consumers continue to have too few air travel rights. As transport secretary, Buttigieg can issue fines to airlines that continue to experience massive disruptions. But before he does, he said he wanted to see what happens over the July 4 weekend and the rest of the summer.

We urge Buttigieg to keep the pressure on airline executives to do better.

Minneapolis Star Tribune

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Van Gogh’s Intimate Exhibit Dedicated to His Final Years Lands at Minneapolis Institute of Art https://himspairport.com/van-goghs-intimate-exhibit-dedicated-to-his-final-years-lands-at-minneapolis-institute-of-art/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:04:05 +0000 https://himspairport.com/van-goghs-intimate-exhibit-dedicated-to-his-final-years-lands-at-minneapolis-institute-of-art/ Iconic painter Vincent van Gogh was a man of nature – but his love for the natural went beyond just a passing interest or phase in his creative career. “Van Gogh struggled with mental illness all his life and obviously he was very troublesome with people and much preferred solitary wandering,” said Matthew Welch, deputy […]]]>

Iconic painter Vincent van Gogh was a man of nature – but his love for the natural went beyond just a passing interest or phase in his creative career.

“Van Gogh struggled with mental illness all his life and obviously he was very troublesome with people and much preferred solitary wandering,” said Matthew Welch, deputy director and chief curator of the Minneapolis Institute of Art. “In his letters to his brother Theo, he repeatedly expressed how nature was in a way his salvation.”

In his last work, he returned to nature, and more particularly to the olive groves surrounding the psychiatric hospital of Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the south of France where he stayed from June to December 1889.

“Van Gogh and the Olive Groves,” a new exhibition opening at Mia on Saturday, takes a focused and intimate look at six works made during this period, with three more from before and after.

A larger version of this show opened in October 2021 in Dallas, then traveled to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. This truncated version at Mia will be her last stop.

Although the exhibition originated elsewhere and was not a project that Mia was directly involved in organizing, her arrival here will be a homecoming of sorts because, in an unusual twist, Mia has lent her prized Impressionist work “Olive Trees”, 1889, at the traveling exhibition. .

Normally, the museum doesn’t loan a work unless it was part of the project from the start, but the Dallas Museum and the Van Gogh Museum have been relentless.

“They kept telling us that it was really vital to their exhibit that our painting be in there,” Welch said. “So finally [Mia director and president] Katie Luber said, “Well, one of the reasons we don’t usually loan her out is that she guts our big Impressionist collection, so what could you do for us?”

The museums generously offered to loan Mia four works from the Van Gogh Museum and two works from Dallas. The exhibition includes an etching, a work in graphite on paper, a watercolor and black stone on paper and six paintings.

“I think it’s kind of a cool project in that it’s a finite number of paintings,” Welch said.

In five of the paintings and one of the graphite sketches on display, all made between June and December 1889, Van Gogh depicts the undulating tree trunks and scorching sun around the mental institute where he stayed.

The three other works exhibited, before or after this period, represent people and places; his engraving “Portrait of Doctor Gachet (Auvers-sur-Oise)”, dated May 15, 1890, was made less than three months before his death.

A typical painting exhibition might have 30-50 works, while an exhibition at Mia’s Target Galleries might have around 130 works.

The Dallas Museum and the Van Gogh Museum have learned through scientific research that Van Gogh did not work strictly in a plein-air technique, which is simply an artist painting from nature and entirely outdoors. Instead, it turns out that when he was outdoors, he blocked out the composition with an oil wash and sketches. At another point, he added the thicker paint that people associate with Van Gogh on top of this preliminary work.

This exhibit certainly provides a sense of intimacy, focusing on the end of Van Gogh’s life, long before he was resurrected as an immersive zombie-like spectacle, which returns to Minneapolis on July, 1st.

“The paintings were created when he was in the depths of his mental illness,” Welch said. “He could see the wheat fields from his room in the psychiatric hospital, then when they let him out of intensive care, he walked through the olive groves surrounding the hospital.”

**

Van Gogh and the olive trees

When: June 25-Sept. 18.

Where: Minneapolis Art Institute, 2400 3rd Ave. S

Hours: 10am-5pm Tue, Wed, Fri-Sun ; 10am-9pm Thu.

Cost: $16, free for ages 17 and under.

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Judge blocks implementation of Minneapolis 2040, citing lack of environmental review https://himspairport.com/judge-blocks-implementation-of-minneapolis-2040-citing-lack-of-environmental-review/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://himspairport.com/judge-blocks-implementation-of-minneapolis-2040-citing-lack-of-environmental-review/ Environmentalists have used the power of the legal system to once again protect the car-centric status quo of single-family zoning. A Hennepin County judge halted implementation of the Minneapolis 2040 Comprehensive Plan on June 15, according to a report by Minnesota Public Radio. Judge Joseph Klein’s decision “made it clear that the city had failed […]]]>

Environmentalists have used the power of the legal system to once again protect the car-centric status quo of single-family zoning.

A Hennepin County judge halted implementation of the Minneapolis 2040 Comprehensive Plan on June 15, according to a report by Minnesota Public Radio.

Judge Joseph Klein’s decision “made it clear that the city had failed to address environmental concerns raised by groups in court,” according to the article. “The city’s expert,” he wrote, “did not ‘specifically address, or purport to refute in any degree of detail, the many detailed assertions advanced by the plaintiffs’ such as the effects of the increase traffic and noise, loss of green space, effects on air and water quality, and stress on existing infrastructure,” according to the article.

The Minneapolis 2040 Comprehensive Plan was one of the first citywide plans to ban single-family zoning entirely — largely for environmental reasons due to the emissions and land-consuming effects of resulting sprawling development. exclusion zoning. Protecting single-family zoning under the guise of environmental concerns is a familiar narrative across the country. The same judge launched an environmental lawsuit against the plan in 2040, paving the way for final passage.

One of the groups behind the lawsuit, Smart Growth Minneapolis, appears to be misapplying the term smart growth, as it is commonly used to argue for planning reforms that promote urban infill and mixed-use density. to allow less vehicle travel and alternative modes of transport.

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Metro Transit woos students with summer passes https://himspairport.com/metro-transit-woos-students-with-summer-passes/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 20:31:24 +0000 https://himspairport.com/metro-transit-woos-students-with-summer-passes/ Minneapolis public school students who take Metro Transit to class ran into a problem last week when the transit agency disabled the Go-To cards used to cover their fares. The cards were due to expire on June 11, when the school year was originally due to end. But classes have been extended for two weeks, […]]]>

Minneapolis public school students who take Metro Transit to class ran into a problem last week when the transit agency disabled the Go-To cards used to cover their fares.

The cards were due to expire on June 11, when the school year was originally due to end. But classes have been extended for two weeks, until June 24, to make up for lost time when teachers were on strike.

Metro Transit issued a memo to drivers telling them that student IDs should be honored as “flash passes”.

“The cards cannot be extended, so the solution is to show the pass to the operator and not scan it,” spokeswoman Laura Baenen said. “Students must show their existing student ID to the operator. They can’t just get on.”

But from Saturday, when summer vacation begins, existing passes will not be accepted and students will have to pay to ride, Baenen said.

That’s where the agency’s Summer Pass comes in. The program will return to full force this year after being scuttled in 2020 due to the pandemic and offered in limited capacity last year.

“We’re hitting the resume button to get students back in transit,” said project manager Jeremy Hop.

About 55 schools are participating in the program this year. The passes, which cost $30, allow students in grades 9 through 12 unlimited rides until Sept. 6 on buses and trains with fares of $3.25 per ride or less. Students can purchase a pass online or in person at a Metro Transit service center by providing their school name and student ID number.

Students who want a pass but are not attending a participating school can contact their school administrators and ask them to register, Hop said.

The Summer Pass can help fill the transportation gap until classes resume in the fall, Hop said. Pass holders made over 2.16 million journeys between 2015 and 2019.

“Students will have summer jobs and activities,” Hop said. “Instead of trying to hassle relatives or friends for a ride, they can just hop on public transit to get where they’re going at a super low price and without the hassle of parking or getting a vehicle.”

Don’t go over the shoulder

Using the shoulder or a turning lane to pass another vehicle is illegal, according to Minnesota law. But apparently the dangerous practice has been a common occurrence on the freeway. 8 in Chisago County.

Sheriff’s deputies, along with other law enforcement, led a crackdown in Wyoming Township last week to curb bad behavior. In four hours, the police issued 23 tickets, most of them for illegally over-the-shoulder drivers.

“Writing accident reports is very time consuming,” the sheriff’s office said. “We hate them. Enforcement and citations are a way to avoid accidents.”

Drivers, here is your warning.

“We will be doing more of these enhanced traffic details throughout the summer,” the sheriff’s office said.

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Minneapolis Mayor Frey vetoes overhaul of Hennepin Avenue and 24-hour bus lanes https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-mayor-frey-vetoes-overhaul-of-hennepin-avenue-and-24-hour-bus-lanes/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 23:58:23 +0000 https://himspairport.com/minneapolis-mayor-frey-vetoes-overhaul-of-hennepin-avenue-and-24-hour-bus-lanes/ article The current rendering of the Hennepin Avenue redesign proposed by Uptown. MINNEAPOLIS (FOX 9) – After a battle between council members and businesses over a redesign of Hennepin Avenue in Minneapolis to add dedicated bike and 24-hour bus lanes was approved by the Minneapolis City Council, it now has is vetoed. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob […]]]>

The current rendering of the Hennepin Avenue redesign proposed by Uptown.

After a battle between council members and businesses over a redesign of Hennepin Avenue in Minneapolis to add dedicated bike and 24-hour bus lanes was approved by the Minneapolis City Council, it now has is vetoed.

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey sent a letter to council members on Friday, informing them that he had vetoed both the development of the proposed Hennepin Ave Street reconstruction (between Douglas Ave and W Lake St.) and a resolution directing the City Engineer to establish parking restrictions. on Hennepin Ave S between Douglas Ave and W Lake St as per plan approved by City Council.

“I continue to support the layout recommended by Public Works, which has not been changed since its introduction in late 2021. The proposed layout includes transit priority lanes, an off-street bike path and significant improvements in safety – that effectively redefine the way we use public space to improve the lives of the people of Minneapolis,” Frey said in the letter. “I fully support a dedicated bus lane with specified hours of operation to reduce congestion and vehicle miles travelled. However, I cannot support maintaining dedicated bus lanes 24 hours a day when buses are not running. 24 hours a day. This would run counter to the countless small businesses, many of which belong to BIPOC, who have compromised both the presence of a protected cycle path and the priority of bus lanes to the detriment from substantial parking numbers, ranging from the global pandemic to civil unrest in 2020, to rising inflation and labor shortages, let’s at least show a willingness to work with them.

The redesign and reconstruction of one of the city’s busiest streets has been underway for some time. Public Works previously released its final recommendation which proposed reducing vehicle-only lanes to two, adding 24/7 transit lanes and a two-way protected bike lane between Lake and Franklin.

“While well intentioned, I fear we will end up with traffic jams. All it will take is one person to park in there. [dedicated bus] path for this to impact operations and leave buses on standby,” Council Member and Public Works Committee Chairman Andrew Johnson said at a June 9 meeting. – and we don’t really have an example of this working successfully yet. The idea is that in a few years we’ll find out, but I think it’s backwards…I feel like it’s a setup where people could be promised one thing and in get another.

If approved as is, the design would leave behind around 20 parking spaces, which businesses along the street have fought for.

“We can meet our shared climate and transportation goals while preserving a reasonable number of parking spaces for community businesses by enabling a flexible operational plan capable of providing public transportation service up to 24 hours a day. 24,” Frey said in the letter. “I urge you to work with my administration and the Public Works leadership team to do just that. This plan must be guided by parameters such as transit delay, speed and reliability; corridor operations ; and safety.”

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Readers Write: Remaking Hennepin Avenue, Saving Trees, Minneapolis Police https://himspairport.com/readers-write-remaking-hennepin-avenue-saving-trees-minneapolis-police/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 22:47:02 +0000 https://himspairport.com/readers-write-remaking-hennepin-avenue-saving-trees-minneapolis-police/ Review Editor’s Note: Star Tribune Opinion publishes letters readers online and in print every day. To contribute, click here. ••• Soren Stevenson’s comment on the Hennepin Avenue remake raised more questions than it answered (“The War in Ukraine, Your Wallet and the Hennepin Avenue Remake”, Opinion Exchange, June 15). He says “rebuilding Hennepin Avenue with […]]]>

Review Editor’s Note: Star Tribune Opinion publishes letters readers online and in print every day. To contribute, click here.

•••

Soren Stevenson’s comment on the Hennepin Avenue remake raised more questions than it answered (“The War in Ukraine, Your Wallet and the Hennepin Avenue Remake”, Opinion Exchange, June 15). He says “rebuilding Hennepin Avenue with a 24/7 bus lane is the best thing Minneapolis can do right now to support Ukraine. It’s the best we can do to support our local businesses.

Oh really? How does a project that will only start in 2024 and take two years to complete support Ukraine in any way, let alone “now”? This argument seems extremely flimsy. But even more absurd is the claim that demolishing the street in front of the businesses on Hennepin Avenue for two years and then limiting or eliminating parking along that street until the next street reconstruction is “the best thing we can do” to support these businesses.

As an Uptown resident, I used to walk to the Apple store and Columbia clothing store in the 3000 block of Hennepin. When this stretch of street was rebuilt into a barren bus lane with no parking, these businesses quickly went out of business. Now I have to travel to the suburbs to avail of their services. How does it save gas?

Buses on Hennepin are primarily used to transport commuters to their jobs in downtown Minneapolis, not to provide access to the local businesses they pass by. And with any luck, the war in Ukraine will be resolved before this ill-conceived road reconstruction is even started, let alone finished.

Donald Wolesky, Minneapolis

•••

Reading the article “Setting the clock on the bus lanes” about Hennepin’s reconstruction (June 14) made me wonder why the walk from its parking spot one or two blocks up to a local business is detrimental to said businesses on Hennepin Avenue, but that same walking from a parked car is not detrimental to the airport, Mall of America, M Health Fairview Southdale Hospital, Target Field, US Bank Stadium, Minnesota State Fairgrounds or even Cub Foods on a busy weekend?

G. Travis Norvell, Minneapolis

REMOVE TREES

The recently announced plan to make Summit Avenue part of a regional trail system doesn’t make it clear that its trees would be at risk, but recent public information sessions have raised concerns among many neighbors and me. (“Talk of Summit Av. trail alarms locals,” June 5).

During the last session on June 6, residents pointed out that its trees are a key part of Summit Avenue’s unique nature and feature prominently on its listing on the National Register of Historic Places. We were informed that “tree removal is not part of this project”. But when a resident pointed out the importance of maintaining sufficient area to protect the roots of existing trees, the response was that “the master plan does not include tree-by-tree considerations”. When asked to make a firm commitment that the project will not harm the trees, the response was that with any construction, things happen.

Unfortunately it’s true. And that is why the analysis must be done at a higher level. Mature trees are irreplaceable. We humans shouldn’t cavalierly expose them to additional risk with the fad plans of the moment. The realities of urban transportation continue to evolve and are difficult to predict. To say “we are working to limit the project’s impact on trees” is retrograde. Instead, we should recognize that the trees of Summit Avenue are paramount and that a threshold requirement for any new construction is a scientifically valid determination that it would not threaten their long-term survival.

Regional trail networks are a valuable aspect of regional planning. But given the incalculable cost to its trees, perhaps Summit Avenue shouldn’t be one of them.

Rosalie O’Brien, St. Paul

•••

Ramsey County Council Commissioner Trista MatasCastillo’s counterpoint to the decimation of mature trees on Cleveland Avenue contains at least two errors (“A Modern Cleveland Avenue Will Serve Generations to Come”, Opinion Exchange, June 14). The first is that it assumes that the planet will be habitable by “future generations” of humans. As climate change ravages the Earth, that is far from certain, and to that end we can ask ourselves whether cutting down more than 150 mature trees helps or hinders that goal.

Second, it seems she and most of us still can’t appreciate the true value of a tree. We seem to think that trees are just another crop like Kentucky bluegrass or hybrid corn. We don’t recognize the web of life that is entangled in a tree – the mammals, birds and insects that depend on it and the soil, water and gases that pass through it. Recent research even raises the possibility that a tree is a sentient being, in a way different from those of us reading this letter, but certainly more alive to the world than the County Board with its “multimodal” gibberish would have it. make you believe it.

County Council, reconsider. Create a society coming after us that cherishes all living beings.

Sue Leaf, Center City, Minn.

MINNEAPOLIS POLICE

What do Minneapolis bartenders, bluegrass bass players and police officers have in common? They can report to work drunk and not lose their jobs (“MP Creates New System of Police Discipline,” June 14).

As usual, Mayor Jacob Frey’s new discipline matrix for the Minneapolis Police Department is too little, too late.

Matthew Byrnes, Minneapolis

•••

Minnesota Department of Human Rights Commissioner Rebecca Lucero must refresh her circumlocutions (“Stalled Mpls. Police talks to resume”, June 11). His denial of the Minneapolis City Attorney’s request for the evidence behind DHR’s report disparaging the Minneapolis police just scoffs at honesty. Since the parties “are not presently before the courts to plead every fact”, no facts need impinge on the inquisition. DHR is the temple of people whose truth cannot wait to be proven.

In defense of DHR, the article features Christy Lopez. Her background is in “patterns and practices investigations” for the US Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division: DHR’s Soulmates. For their part, she assures us that the obstruction of DHR is perfectly normal for this stage of the process. No evidence needs to be revealed unless the city dares to doubt DHR’s omniscience and is taken to court.

Lopez and Lucero must reconcile their stories. Lucero says “the city already has the evidence to back up his agency’s findings.” Meanwhile, the city says it has found evidence to debunk one of DHR’s key claims: that the MPD never spied on white organizations like it did on black ones.

Since no one in the DHR camp cares much about the facts, they have no reason to object to the accusation of not telling us about the nature and extent of the problems at the MPD. And that raises a long-awaited question about the honesty of the entire “race count” of the past two years. How many more lies have we swallowed down our throats of guilt? How far from reality does this crusade take place? And how much complexity can a word really explain?

Charles Jolliffe, Edina

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1910 Prairie Schoolhouse on Mount Curve in Minneapolis cost $2.85 million https://himspairport.com/1910-prairie-schoolhouse-on-mount-curve-in-minneapolis-cost-2-85-million/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 06:55:53 +0000 https://himspairport.com/1910-prairie-schoolhouse-on-mount-curve-in-minneapolis-cost-2-85-million/ Throughout George Maher’s career, from the late 1800s through the 1920s, he was part of an enclave of well-known Prairie School-style architects, apprenticed at Silsbee and Kent in Chicago at the time Frank Lloyd Wright and George Grant Elmslie were draftsmen. . Maher then imagined famous estates for prominent families, including the Winton family. The […]]]>

Throughout George Maher’s career, from the late 1800s through the 1920s, he was part of an enclave of well-known Prairie School-style architects, apprenticed at Silsbee and Kent in Chicago at the time Frank Lloyd Wright and George Grant Elmslie were draftsmen. .

Maher then imagined famous estates for prominent families, including the Winton family. The lumber magnates commissioned the Chicago-based architect to design their 1910 Lowry Hill mansion on Curve Mountain in which Jim and Shahnaz Costa now live and which continues to be studied for its design.

“Like his colleagues at the Prairie School, he believed that architectural form should follow function and that American architects should strive to create a new vocabulary of form,” reads an excerpt from the Minneapolis Institute of Art’s Lake of the Isles Tour highlighting nine Minneapolis homes of architectural significance.

“The Winton House, based on a Maher house designed for Charles and Helen Winton in Wausau [Wis.], reflects Maher’s ideals of symmetry, mass, and centralization. Its overhanging eaves, low, horizontal roofline and entryway are typical features of the Prairie style. »

Prairie Style Features

Like his contemporaries, Maher used Prairie style features such as horizontal lines, patterns, and natural materials.

Maher preferred symmetry in his creations, predominant throughout the Costa house. The living room has floor to ceiling windows at opposite ends of the room. The living room and master bedroom have central fireplaces with two sets of double doors on either side that lead to four season porches. Even sconces in an upstairs hallway are designed to hold two bulbs – one up, one down – for symmetry.

Maher also incorporated unifying elements. In the case of the Mount Curve house, poppy flower patterns can be found in windows and leaded light fixtures throughout. “Poppies [on the stained glass] turn blue or peachy depending on the time of day and how the sun hits it,” Jim said. “It is a very complete house.

He added that the house also benefited from having a large logging family behind it.

“Because this house was commissioned by the Winton family, you can imagine what beautiful pieces of wood products have been incorporated into the house,” Jim said. “The house has this very beautiful quarter-sawn mahogany and oak wood.”

Preserve its integrity

The Costas appreciated that the house had been carefully preserved.

At one point in its history, architectural designer Elizabeth Hyatt, behind several notable historic homes, notably in the Lake of the Isles-Lowry Hill area, lived in the house with her husband, Henry.

“The Hyatts remodeled the house after they had lived there for several years,” Jim said. “It is significant to have Elizabeth’s hand in this historic house. … As old as this house is, it is in remarkable condition.”

While living there, the Hyatts were also in contact with the Minneapolis Institute of Art. They donated pieces such as three poppy flower window panels along a kitchen wall which are now on display at the museum. Additionally, the Hyatts have made the museum the steward of some notable items currently in the house, such as the light fixtures.

“They wanted to make sure the history of the house was preserved,” Jim said.

The Costas have also maintained the home, making improvements such as adding landscaping including a perennial garden and fruit trees, upgrading the stucco exterior with fresh paint in a more rich, placing a retaining wall and updating the roof. Inside, they updated the kitchen and interior finishes.

“We just want to make sure it’s maintained,” Jim said. “But the condition of this house is in amazing condition. It really doesn’t need a lot of updates.”

Downsizing

Now that their children are grown, the Costas are downsizing.

So, after eight years, they listed the seven-bedroom, seven-bathroom home covering 10,400 square feet. The half-acre lot also includes a four-storey shed/garage, with a finished apartment on the second level and two underground floors.

Listing agent Meredith Howell said that in addition to the home’s rich history, the place offers many amenities such as a third-floor recreation room with a kitchenette and an entertainment and exercise room on the lower level. The chef’s kitchen has two refrigerators, two dishwashers and three sinks. The master suite includes a fireplace, sleeping porch, en-suite bathroom and walk-in closet.

She added that the extent of home preservation is not something one encounters every day. “I love that her story has been embraced and things have been kept,” Howell said.

The Costas said a new owner would appreciate the quality of the design and construction of the home, not to mention its timeless nature.

“It has a modern feel as there is a lot of square design [elements]. The design feels current despite being 110 years old,” Jim said, adding that despite its size, the house looks quaint between the layout and details such as the pocket doors that allow rooms to be closed off. “It’s a hybrid of an open layout but still there are compartmentalized and generous rooms.”

Shahnaz said the home is ideal for entertaining, especially in spaces such as the formal dining room. “It’s just beautiful with all the original woodwork, fixtures and cabinetry and how it looks on Minneapolis,” she said.

For the Costas, they hope that the next owners will carry on the tradition of its former inhabitants.

“The guy who sold it to us when he was leaving said he considered himself the caretaker of the house. We feel the same way. We are just happy to have had the opportunity to live there and preserve,” Jim said. . “We have enjoyed living in the house and hope to pass it on to future caretakers who appreciate architecture and design as much as we do.”

Meredith Howell (mhowell@cbburnet.com; 612-940-4566) of the Global Luxury division of Coldwell Banker Realty, holds the $2.85 million SEO.

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Conclusion: Morgan Wallen disappoints, Eric Church triumphs during their first concert in a stadium in Minneapolis https://himspairport.com/conclusion-morgan-wallen-disappoints-eric-church-triumphs-during-their-first-concert-in-a-stadium-in-minneapolis/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 05:27:11 +0000 https://himspairport.com/conclusion-morgan-wallen-disappoints-eric-church-triumphs-during-their-first-concert-in-a-stadium-in-minneapolis/ Like Hank Williams and Willie Nelson, country superstar Eric Church does things his own way. Last year, he released two albums in one month – ‘Heart’ and ‘Soul’ – and sent his fan club members a third album, ‘&’. This spring, he canceled a sold-out concert in San Antonio just so he could attend the […]]]>

Like Hank Williams and Willie Nelson, country superstar Eric Church does things his own way.

Last year, he released two albums in one month – ‘Heart’ and ‘Soul’ – and sent his fan club members a third album, ‘&’.

This spring, he canceled a sold-out concert in San Antonio just so he could attend the North Carolina-Duke Final Four basketball game. (He’s from North Carolina.)

On Saturday, he invited Morgan Wallen, country music persona non grata in 2021, to join him at U.S. Bank Stadium, one of only two stadium gigs on Church’s 2022 itinerary.

Last year, Wallen was banned from radio, concerts and award shows after he was caught on camera uttering a racial slur. Nonetheless, he ended up with the best-selling project of 2021, “Dangerous: The Double Album,” even outselling Adele’s “30.”

After a long ostracization, Wallen hit the road again this year, mostly headlining weekend gigs. No gig was bigger, however, than joining Church’s hoedown stadium billed as “One Hell of a Night”.

“I’ve played 35 shows this year. I’m more nervous for this one than all of them together,” said Wallen, 29, who is single-handedly bringing the mullet back. He later explained that the first major concert he attended was at Church in 2014.

The sold-out Minneapolis crowd of 51,117 shouted their encouragement to Wallen.

Was the crowd amplified because everyone seems to like a bad boy? (The Outcast had other flaws, including being arrested for disorderly conduct outside Kid Rock’s bar in Nashville and being fired from “Saturday Night Live” for failing to follow COVID protocols. ) Or was it because country fans love his music?

Wallen’s tunes proudly double down on whiskey, twang and small towns, but you might have needed three beers to appreciate his performance on Saturday.

A solid songwriter, he lacked presence in large venues and, more disconcertingly, he was a pedestrian singer on stage, prone to pitch issues and outright shouting, confusing defiance and bawling nasally with passion.

Musically, Wallen has one foot in bro-country, some toes in modern country with electro and hip-hop elements, and one in traditional country.

His most impressive efforts on Saturday were selections he didn’t write – an acoustic playback of Jason Isbell’s vulnerable love song “Cover Me Up” and Wallen’s clever and heartbreaking 2018 hit “Whiskey Glasses “, a classic country tune filled with double hits and double meanings. One of the best country songs of this century, it was the heart-pounding finale to Wallen’s 85-minute set.

For Church, 45, who played two consecutive nights at Target Center in 2019, this is his first foray into stadiums. A Nashville marathon man known for his rare three-hour shows, he seamlessly turned his brand of country brio into football field fare. Guitars roared, drums kicked and vocals soared, both from Church and back-up vocalist Joanna Cotten.

Opener “Outsiders” rocked with a metallic edge, “Desperate Man” despairing with a Stonesian vibe, and “Pledge Allegiance to the Hag” galvanized like a true country anthem, with trombone, saxophone, and trumpet blast.

The crowd loved “Smoke a Little Smoke” with its swampy beats and the creepy electronica “Creepin’” with Church’s soulful vocals. He juxtaposed the soulful ballad “These Boots” with the fiery “Stick That in Your Country Song,” ending his triumphant 130-minute performance a few ticks before midnight.

Like his hero Bruce Springsteen, Church sang with such consistent conviction over rockers and ballads that he felt like this might have been his last performance. But he said he would like to come back to Minneapolis, maybe next Saturday night. It would be another maverick move from Church.

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Feds charge two men with carjackings targeting Uber drivers in Minneapolis https://himspairport.com/feds-charge-two-men-with-carjackings-targeting-uber-drivers-in-minneapolis/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 22:44:23 +0000 https://himspairport.com/feds-charge-two-men-with-carjackings-targeting-uber-drivers-in-minneapolis/ MINNEAPOLIS (FOX 9) – Federal authorities have arrested two young men in a series of carjackings in which investigators say they repeatedly targeted Uber and Lyft drivers in Minneapolis. Shevirio Childs-Young, 18, and William Saffold, 20, are charged in an indictment with 20 counts, including conspiracy, brandishing firearms during and in connection with a crime […]]]>

Federal authorities have arrested two young men in a series of carjackings in which investigators say they repeatedly targeted Uber and Lyft drivers in Minneapolis.

Shevirio Childs-Young, 18, and William Saffold, 20, are charged in an indictment with 20 counts, including conspiracy, brandishing firearms during and in connection with a crime of violence, complicity in carjacking and complicity in interference. with commerce by theft under the Hobbs Law.

Prosecutors say the carjackings took place from September to October 2021. During that time, police issued a citywide alert for carpool drivers, warning that thieves were targeting them.

Federal prosecutors said the two men staged a scheme where they would lure drivers to certain locations for pickups. But, when the drivers arrived, the men held them at gunpoint, demanding that they transfer money to them using their phones, before taking their cars.

During the robberies, prosecutors said the suspects threatened to kill the drivers and sometimes whipped them with guns.

Saffold made his first court appearance on Wednesday. Childs-Young is already in state custody but will appear in federal court at a later date. FOX 9 previously reported brushes between Childs-Young and law enforcement.

Prosecutors say the arrests were a joint effort by Minneapolis police and the FBI.

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